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The plight of whites in racist South Africa

Race-based assaults equal racism. Punishing people for the (alleged) sins of their fathers doesn’t “undo” injustices of the past. Perpetuating “injustice” in the present will just breed more injustice.

Based on evidence from Zimbabwe it is likely that these activities will lead to food shortages & other issues for the people that remain in South Africa.

It is unlikely that sinful man is capable of devising a process of “righting the wrongs of the past” in a way that doesn’t perpetuate evil against others. There is a need for reconciliation, forgiveness, healing, & perhaps restoration but genocide will produce none of that…

At Stella’s Place I also left these comments at the end of her article.  They include some of my reflections on my personal experiences in Africa some years back so I decided to copy them here in case they might be of interest to others too…

  1. Thanks for sharing this, Stella.

    I was in West Africa in the late ’80s & in that country, Liberia, it was “illegal” for whites to own property (so we were told). I assumed this was some type of “compensation” to the freed American slaves to protect them. However, in our black market dealings with currency exchange (official exchange rate was 1:1 Liberian$:US$ but was 2:1 L$:US$ on the black market) we were taken by the black African pastors we worked with to white “owners” (in all but name) of local businesses to exchange our money. Interestingly my traveler’s checques were exchanged at the full 2:1 rate while my colleagues cash was changed at 1.9:1…hmm…

    One pastor’s house we had a meal in was well staffed by servants. Everyone was black. My classmates & I were amazed how the pastor & his wife seemed to treat their servants as if they weren’t even there (my colleagues & I made a point of thanking them & looking in their faces as they cared for everyone’s needs during the meal–they seemed shocked that we would acknowledge them & treat them as equals). My good friend, who was black, (I was the only white person in our group during that part of the trip) & I discussed the servant situation & were both surprised that the servants were the same race as the pastor. We’d both thought that they would be having servants of another race & that would have partially explained their seeming indifference & seeming aura of superiority toward them.

    Ironically, this was in the era of Jesse Jackson running for U. S. President, there was a lively discussion of the hopes around the table that Jackson might win. I refrained from speaking my mind on that topic for I thought Jackson a buffoon & joke (irrespective of skin color) but didn’t want to get into what would likely become a fairly heated discussion. Given all the skin color passes given to Obama during his “presidential” aspirations/usurpation all those years later that dinner time conversation among blacks half-way around the world was something to reflect upon. I didn’t then, nor do I now, really understand how people gave someone on the national stage such a pass purely because they bore the color/ethnicity (allegedly) that certain people desired to see in power…

    There was also some sort of weird racism on the streets of Monrovia in general where I (being white) was attempted to be treated better than my black colleagues. They tried to take color photos of me & b&w only of my colleagues, etc. They also called me “missy” & my colleagues “sistah”…etc. There were physically deformed beggars everywhere you went & if you ever pulled out a coin you would get mobbed. The pastor said some parents would cause their child to get a physical deformity (injure them in childhood, etc) so they could have a “career” as a professional beggar! It was all very strange & surreal to our American grad student group…

Stella's Place

You will probably have noticed that photos posted this week are of sights in South Africa. It is a beautiful country with seacoast, mountain, desert, plains, and sub-tropical regions, and many exotic – to our eyes – animals and plants.

The reality of politics in South Africa is not beautiful. It is ugly and racist. The population of South Africa is multi-ethnic, with whites and Asians in the minority. Wikipedia’s breakdown of the SA population of 55,000,000 is as follows:

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Chicken Soup–for the Soul?

I hadn’t been planning on writing about this but was inspired to put “pen to paper” (fingers to keyboard & manipulate a “mouse”) by a posting at Stella’s Place here:

Cooking with vegetables – something new, something different

Stella asked “Are you cooking up any new dishes? Or an old favorite that will be new to us?”  So here is my reply:

Valerie Curren says:

March 12, 2018 at 6:37 am

  • I just made a large pot of soup based on items we had around–chicken scraps (cut from chicken breasts used in another recipe), a whole boneless chicken breast, & several pieces of chicken (legs & wing) that one of my kids brought home from their restaurant job & I’d had in the freezer.

    My son made several boxes of mac & cheese the other day & we’d saved that pasta water (that I’d later poured back in his mac & cheese pot to scrape off the flavorful residue). There was a partial can of chicken broth from a recipe my daughter made a few days ago & some veggie scraps. All of that went into a pot & cooked for an hour or so. I pulled all the solids from the pot & deboned, de-fatted, & de-grissled the meat giving scraps to a happy dog & cut the chicken into smallish pieces. I also broke the large bones in half & returned to the pot to fortify the stock with the marrow. From the veggie scraps I salvaged what was edible (like the soft interior of fibrous broccoli stems) & returned that to the pot.

    Then I added chopped fresh veggies that we had on hand (potato, carrot, & onion) & cooked until those were cooked through. When heating to serve I added a can each of corn, mushrooms, & diced tomatoes along with some chopped garlic. Then we threw in some wine left over in the fridge & cut up some spaghetti from a recent meal into bite size pieces & added it at the end just to heat through. I added a lot of garlic salt, freshly ground pepper, & various Italian spices (including rosemary, sage, thyme, & basil). We had this soup with grilled (meat for some &) cheese sandwiches. Most of my family really liked the soup as is. I thought it needed a bit more seasoning, but then perhaps my taste-buds are changing with age.

    This was completely experimental soup loosely inspired by some that my mom makes & the Olive Garden’s pasta fajoule (sp?). It’ll probably never be repeated exactly…& this is the closest I’ll come to recording it. It’s not as fanciful or flavorful as my grandma’s “garbage soup” made from various kitchen scraps she’d accumulated over time (everything she made was Amazing–my cooking is adequate–my husband is the food genius of our family!) but based on the principle of not letting usable food go to waste. I’d wanted to add celery but someone had pitched the few stalks we’d had left. I also wish I would have added some fresh garlic, but by that point my back hurt so I settled for the residue from the jar. This was the first pot of soup I’d ever made that was seasoned in a more Italian manner…One of twins just had his first bowl & said it was “really good”. He only added some garlic salt & crushed red pepper to his taste. I guess around here that constitutes success!

    from a bing.com image search for chicken soup

    So I’m attempting to add further info here & can’t figure out how to get out of the list format & align this writing to the left margin–sigh…I’m not at all tech savvy & definitely a work in progress.

    I just wanted to add that it felt good to provide a nourishing meal for my family, a labor of love in an area that is not really my strong suit.  It is a blessing that they all ended up enjoying this particular chicken soup more than usual & I’m glad that I was able to give my husband a break from meal prep for at least this one day.

    My mother used to call Chicken Soup “Jewish penicillin” & I think she got that term from some Jewish neighbors in her childhood Detroit home.  I remember reviewing both of my parents’ childhood neighbors on the 1940 Census & marveling at the ethnic mix of immigrants they lived amongst–what a glorious patchwork quilt of America.  Perhaps making chicken soup back in that WWII era was a way of taking care of the needs of others & that caring can extend forward from our forbears to our present day.  I made a physical pot of chicken soup but maybe it was just slightly beyond ministry in just the material plane & was actually in a small way Chicken Soup for my Family’s Soul…Blessings!

President Trump at the Gridiron Dinner

Stella captures the Trumps at the Gridiron Dinner–includes a transcript of President Trump’s remarks…Fun!

Stella's Place

President Donald and First Lady Melania Trump attended the Gridiron dinner with members of the press corps last night.

His speech was light-hearted, meant to be funny, as the dinner is an opportunity to poke fun. A couple of his notable comments:

  • “This might be the most fun I’ve had since watching your faces on election night.”
  • He told the media elites he and The New York Times are both New York City icons — “the only difference is I still own my buildings.”
  • President Trump told journalists who belong to the Gridiron Club that he wanted to come this year and “ruin your evening in person.”

No cameras were allowed at the event, although there are a couple of poor quality shots obviously taken by attendees. Jared Kushner and Ivanka Trump were also in attendance.

Here is the transcript of President Trump’s speech, compliments of Greta Van Susteren:

GRETA:…

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