Tag Archive | South Africa

The plight of whites in racist South Africa

Race-based assaults equal racism. Punishing people for the (alleged) sins of their fathers doesn’t “undo” injustices of the past. Perpetuating “injustice” in the present will just breed more injustice.

Based on evidence from Zimbabwe it is likely that these activities will lead to food shortages & other issues for the people that remain in South Africa.

It is unlikely that sinful man is capable of devising a process of “righting the wrongs of the past” in a way that doesn’t perpetuate evil against others. There is a need for reconciliation, forgiveness, healing, & perhaps restoration but genocide will produce none of that…

At Stella’s Place I also left these comments at the end of her article.  They include some of my reflections on my personal experiences in Africa some years back so I decided to copy them here in case they might be of interest to others too…

  1. Thanks for sharing this, Stella.

    I was in West Africa in the late ’80s & in that country, Liberia, it was “illegal” for whites to own property (so we were told). I assumed this was some type of “compensation” to the freed American slaves to protect them. However, in our black market dealings with currency exchange (official exchange rate was 1:1 Liberian$:US$ but was 2:1 L$:US$ on the black market) we were taken by the black African pastors we worked with to white “owners” (in all but name) of local businesses to exchange our money. Interestingly my traveler’s checques were exchanged at the full 2:1 rate while my colleagues cash was changed at 1.9:1…hmm…

    One pastor’s house we had a meal in was well staffed by servants. Everyone was black. My classmates & I were amazed how the pastor & his wife seemed to treat their servants as if they weren’t even there (my colleagues & I made a point of thanking them & looking in their faces as they cared for everyone’s needs during the meal–they seemed shocked that we would acknowledge them & treat them as equals). My good friend, who was black, (I was the only white person in our group during that part of the trip) & I discussed the servant situation & were both surprised that the servants were the same race as the pastor. We’d both thought that they would be having servants of another race & that would have partially explained their seeming indifference & seeming aura of superiority toward them.

    Ironically, this was in the era of Jesse Jackson running for U. S. President, there was a lively discussion of the hopes around the table that Jackson might win. I refrained from speaking my mind on that topic for I thought Jackson a buffoon & joke (irrespective of skin color) but didn’t want to get into what would likely become a fairly heated discussion. Given all the skin color passes given to Obama during his “presidential” aspirations/usurpation all those years later that dinner time conversation among blacks half-way around the world was something to reflect upon. I didn’t then, nor do I now, really understand how people gave someone on the national stage such a pass purely because they bore the color/ethnicity (allegedly) that certain people desired to see in power…

    There was also some sort of weird racism on the streets of Monrovia in general where I (being white) was attempted to be treated better than my black colleagues. They tried to take color photos of me & b&w only of my colleagues, etc. They also called me “missy” & my colleagues “sistah”…etc. There were physically deformed beggars everywhere you went & if you ever pulled out a coin you would get mobbed. The pastor said some parents would cause their child to get a physical deformity (injure them in childhood, etc) so they could have a “career” as a professional beggar! It was all very strange & surreal to our American grad student group…

Stella's Place

You will probably have noticed that photos posted this week are of sights in South Africa. It is a beautiful country with seacoast, mountain, desert, plains, and sub-tropical regions, and many exotic – to our eyes – animals and plants.

The reality of politics in South Africa is not beautiful. It is ugly and racist. The population of South Africa is multi-ethnic, with whites and Asians in the minority. Wikipedia’s breakdown of the SA population of 55,000,000 is as follows:

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