Tag Archive | re-blogging

Feelings

This a beautiful post that seems to encapsulate some aspects of the autism experience from within. I’m so thankful that some people will choose to open up & share their unique insights from their personal perspective. I hope to get my autistic son to read the original post some time & see if he actually relates to this description of emotional/sensory overload.

Image result for feelings scripture

from a Bing.com image search for “feelings scripture”

Here’s what I shared with the author:

valeriecurren
Beautifully & eloquently stated. This helps me understand my autistic son just a little bit better. Thank you for sharing this!

Image result for feelings scripture

from a Bing.com image search for “feelings scripture”

Image result for feelings scripture

from a Bing.com image search for “feelings scripture”

Please read the original post, I will revisit it too, which is why it’s posted to my blog, for it is precious & in her own words!  Blessings, Valerie

autismthoughts

I think I feel too much. That is what autism is most like for me. Autism is feeling everything acutely all the time. I literally feel everything. I feel every object in a room. I feel sounds and smells and tastes. I feel words. I feel emotions. I can’t say I feel differently than you because I don’t know exactly how you feel. I have never been you. But I can say that I feel everything physically. And it is exhausting…

I was telling a friend today that I think I love too much. Love for me is overwhelming. It makes my whole body tingle. Love is a burst of energy that penetrates every fiber of my being. It feels like it literally changes my DNA so that I am now connected to a person in a way that they are made a part of me. I love hugs because it…

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“Touching The Past” & The Old Key

“I hope the drive to discover our family’s past also leads us to share it with close and distant family in order to pay the proper homage to generations past.”

Brass Key fancy

That quote is at the end of this lovely blog post (see below). There is so much richness in what he wrote. What a lovely personal sharing of the meaningfulness of those that have gone before us and the special treasures they have left behind through which we can also connect to them.

This post inspires me to want to go through some of my own inherited treasures, and more particularly through many of the older items that enhance The Cottage ambiance Up North…to capture their stories (as known or speculated) and to record these musings for our present edification and other’s future enlightenment.

One small “treasure” that I hope will pass down to me from my parents some distant future day is a large brass key that my grandparents found beach-combing along the shores of one of the Great Lakes (Erie?). When my dad was young he used to teethe on it.

This key represents mystery to me. It has a tangible connection to my Family of Origin but an unexplored and likely unknowable connection to the past. It very well could even be evidence of some long ago shipwreck. Also, its size suggests that it went to something significant like perhaps a large trunk or even an ancient door. Although its true origins will likely Never be known it’s more recent personal past is quite precious to me.

So now the “To Do List” needs to expand into the cataloging of personal history archival exhibits…What (at least theoretical) Fun!

Blessings,

Valerie

PS  The key image above is similar to my Dad’s key, though his is less ornate…but I really liked how it was presented in the above picture; image from this site–

http://www.bluewillowhouse.com/2015/05/28/ttt-week-38-vintage-finds/

…perhaps because I also appreciate so much of the creatively imaginative Steampunk artistic galaxy…hmm…

Moore Genealogy

Carl with the 172 year old Monty Family Bible. Carl with the 172 year old Monty Family Bible.

On our recent trip to our hometown, my wife and I were very fortunate to be able to see and hold items that once belonged and were used by my wife’s ancestors. But even more fortunate we were to learn some of the stories behind these articles. This experience helped to bring these people from mere dates in the past to real individuals who gave the breath of life to future generations. Much of this was made possible by my wife’s cousin Carl Gonya who before high school took up the mantle of the family historian. His exhaustive research into the family lines started long before the internet made things so much easier but in many cases made for shoddier research. His collection of family artifacts and pictures is impressive and the result of diligent family research.

The 172 years old…

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