Tag Archive | issues

Commenting on a Transplant Tale

I’m still coming to grips with a sea of emotions in relation to my son’s Liver Transplant (among many other medical, educational, and interpersonal issues surrounding his life and my intense involvement in caring for his myriad needs) so it is always with a bit of trepidation that I approach other’s stories about the Transplant Journey.  This arena represents a potential emotional hand grenade for me personally & it’s never certain what might cause the pin’s removal leading to potentially devastating internal destruction.

The article below was impacting enough that I just felt compelled to write a comment afterwards, which I wanted to document here and share with my readers and also give myself a known repository of this particular topic in case I want to return to this article again…like for inspiration to gear up for when we finally contact the “Gift of Life” organ registry to attempt a contact with the donor family to express our deepest gratitude.

Such a contact has thus far remained beyond my personal ability to approach except in the most theoretical terms.  It’s hard to know where to begin in expressing the deep gratitude for the life-giving sacrificial gift this other family has provided.  We spent so much time while waiting for the Transplant in prayer for the family and the donor, asking that the Lord would be involved in all their lives, that they would each have a saving knowledge of Him, that there would be such wonderful memories made and no regrets for things left unsaid or undone with the donor.  Contemplating the eventual loss of such a loved one was almost more than I could bear.  What do you say when the Liver Transplant doctor says that your son’s “ideal candidate would be a 12 year old gun shot victim”.  I was more overwhelmed by  the other family’s impending loss than I was by our own upheaval as we awaited this amazing and generous Gift of Life.

Complicating such contemplations is the nature of my son’s complex medical status.  Some staff on the Transplant Team mentioned that in some locales they wouldn’t even offer a transplant to someone as complex as my son (the implication being that his autism or other atypicalities, not necessarily medical in nature, may have lead to a form of disability discrimination against him).  How will this other family feel when they discover that their child’s Liver Recipient is disabled in myriad ways?  What if God has yet to have answered some of the prayers noted above and this family is in a spiritual desert and cannot grasp the value of my son’s life because of his disabilities?  What if learning about who has received their child’s liver they are even more devastated by who/what he is and this adds immeasurably to their grief, pain, and loss?  Should I spearhead the effort to contact them and generate conversations periodically within our family, or at Liver Transplant Clinic Visits (we have another bi-annual one next week), to help prepare us, or should I wait for God to so move on my son, husband, or other family members?  Should I be the one to make the contact or should my son (who has various communication challenges but is incredibly gifted in spiritual insight and compassion) attempt this solo?

Just writing some of these lingering questions down reminds me that this is a process that needs to be bathed in prayer.  I need to reach some place of peace and serenity so that regardless of the donor family’s experience/reception we will feel “persuaded” in our ultimate approach in contacting them.

Any of you reading this that know the Lord please lift us up in prayer as we continue to process and prepare to eventually make contact via Gift of Life and express our Thanksgiving for this family’s Gift of Life to our son!  We don’t want to be among the 9 lepers who didn’t return to thank the Lord for the healing…

Image result for 10 lepers

image from bing.com image search

Image result for luke 17:11-19

image from bing.com image search

image from bing.com image search original from blogspot.com

Please consider reading the original story of this group of Transplant Recipients meeting the mother of the Gift of Life donor…what testimonies!

Here is the link to the original article:

https://gma.yahoo.com/face-transplant-organ-recipients-meet-donors-mother-first-181313919.html

Face Transplant and Organ Recipients Meet Donor’s Mother for the First Time (ABC News)

Here are my comments left at the above article’s website:

This story is profoundly moving to me as the mother of a liver transplant recipient. My son was a teenager while going through the transplant process and as a strong Christian was prepared to possibly die if the surgery was unsuccessful. (Before his transplant operation he wanted to tell the surgical team “If I die during the surgery don’t be sad because I’m ready to go home and be with Jesus”–wow). As a young man on the Autism Spectrum he had a hard time understanding that for him to receive the needed whole liver a donor would have to die, so he initially thought he would be murdering someone to get their liver. We had to reassure him that it was ultimately God who would decide who lives and dies and it would all be in His hands…we were not causing the other family’s desperate scenario…

One way my son was comforted in being the recipient of the Gift of Life from someone whose life was cut short was that we agreed before his procedure that if he didn’t survive we would be sure to donate all of his usable organs and tissues so that others would also receive such life-sustaining gifts from him. In fact, while we were waiting for “his” liver we were contacted by the Liver Transplant Team to be prepared as a back-up recipient for another “perfect liver”, a seemingly unprecedented event. At that time another child was higher up on the Transplant List but was so ill that it was possible that they wouldn’t survive the procedure and my son who was to be “waiting on deck” would then get that other liver. This situation was just so unbearable for me personally, thinking that already one family was losing a child for my son to receive a liver was already overwhelming, and it would be incredibly devastating that TWO people would die so that my son would benefit. We called family together and beseeched the Lord in fervent prayer on behalf of this other child…and thankfully they (apparently) survived the surgery and were still doing well more than a year later when my son finally received his transplant. Being involved in a Transplant situation is deeply moving, challenging, and ultimately a lifelong journey of discovery.

Thank the Lord for those brave and generous families who choose to give the Gift of Life during their own season of heartbreaking loss and bereavement!

After checking back at the original article here is a reply to my comment that may have been written by someone who is professionally involved with transplants, and this is such an encouragement to me as it may be representative of other’s perspectives:

  • Avatar
  • these are the stories that make participating in an organ harvest so rewarding. One family’s loss can lead to so many benefits for other families, it is unfathomable. However, the pain, the heartache the loss is so palpable, during our surgical timeout the donor identified…the directed donations are identified as well as research donations. These are huge and incredible gifts

 

 

 

 

Commenting on “Autism it’s Different in Girls” (& so is ADHD)

looking for images with this post…here’s a great Pinterest site

I recently read an intriguing blog post by someone who has autism but chooses to remain Anonymous…hopefully there will be many other nuggets to mine in her blog as well as the interesting comments sections filled with feedback & unique perspectives.

I had wanted (in my comments below) to go into the girls aspect of Autism and mention how there may be a continuum between Autism and ADHD…I’d read a book a few years back that laid out a good scientific case for this insight.  Later, while doing massive amounts of research for Josiah’s special education needs/case I read a number of things that talked about ADHD and how it presents in females…and in particular how there are some mothers of kids with ADHD (and/or autism?) who were never diagnosed themselves but see so many of their “issues” reflected in their kids struggle…apparently to the point that this is a “thing” that gets some degree of recognition in certain circles.

(ironically, while looking for images found these “circles” supporting my views!)

Autism: Different, Not Less:

(from the above Pinterest board…and almost every item ascribed to my son)

Just a few of the many disorders associated with ADHD. Many have similar symptoms and impairments. Getting the correct diagnosis is further confused by the high morbidity rates associated with ADHD. (View only)                                                                                                                                                      More:

the image above is from this pinterest page

I’ve meant to look back on this topic for my own “edification” but have been mightily depleted by the Special Ed case and fallout that it just hasn’t happened yet.  In our family of 6, 4 have officially been diagnosed with ADHD, & the two that haven’t (myself and Brandon, Josiah’s twin brother) exhibit quite a few of the ADHD traits (but perhaps not enough to rise to the clinical level of diagnosis…but then again who’s actually asking to be “officially” labeled)…so we think we probably both have some part of ADHD, at a minimum.  So if the continuum theory holds water, could it be that people that have ADHD are on the (potentially) mild end of the Autism Spectrum?

It’s so hard to really say and it may in large part depend on who you ask and what their personal practice emphasis (if you only have a hammer then everything looks like a nail and all!) might be…It is supported in research, I believe, that many times the parents of kids on the Spectrum have many of those traits themselves.  Certainly when “we” were growing up awareness of Autism “Spectrum” issues was nowhere near the level it is at now.  Also, if it is shown that there is any level of a genetic component to Autism and/or ADHD it would stand to reason that these things would run in families to some degree.

In my own family, from a retrospective perspective there could be arguments made that both my parents have possessed some traits of ADHD, especially when younger.  At least one of my brothers had many such traits when young and his son was also officially diagnosed with ADHD.  My other brother has a couple of kids that seem to have a lot of such traits too.  My husband wasn’t diagnosed with ADHD until adulthood, but it surely negatively impacted his academic trajectory when younger, even though he has learned to “compensate” for the ADHD issues as an adult, as have most of our kids.

Most everyone in my present family has some degree of sensory issue and we all possess varying degrees of emotional vulnerability, but thankfully this trait is at least somewhat intermittent in most of us!  Could these also be evidence of the “Spectrum” Continuum?

The author of the Autism in Girls post speculates on how important it is to find out what is going on with you and to get that diagnostic label (paraphrasing without re-reading her actual words…so I could already be distorting inadvertently her view) and therefore enable some degree of an “Autistic Identity”.  This apparently resonates with a lot of her readers, at least those who have posted comments.  It’s possible that she  draws in these more “anonymously autistic” people by the very nature of the type of blog she writes, as in people who are on the Spectrum, but can “fake it” sufficiently for the outside world to not know they are autistic…

It’s hard for me to relate to the “need” to find an identity, like in Autism.  And frankly I really do not “get” that aspect of our current culture that seems to think one has to discover a “role model” to emulate in order to aspire to things that no one “like me” has ever done before.  This will likely be controversial, and even offensive to some (sorry)–but Obama being “President” of the US should not really make it any more of less easy for any other “black” person to be the President…if the job was about the merits of the individual aspiring to the position (and who could argue that this election year!) and not about someone’s “identity”…and if he had actually obtained such a job based on his own merits (which he manifestly did Not do based on his abysmally thin resume)–no “white” man with his background, (lack of) accomplishments, known dangerous associates, and incredibly thin skin would have ever gotten near to the place of getting his finger on “the button”…but I digress…

Anyway, I don’t fully get why so many people feel the need to find such a label and thereby get some type of identity by identifying with a group.  Obviously, for anyone who knows me very well, I have spent much of my life in isolation, going against the flow, and refusing to join into whatever “group” (like Groucho Marx I wouldn’t be a member of any group that would have me!)…so the herd mentality is far from appealing to me personally.

I do, however, take a measure of identity from my personal faith…as in I’ve considered myself a strong Christian for the bulk of my life and that remains my primary identity…but I am much more likely to think of myself as a person (even as an intellect) than as a woman, wife, mother, daughter, sister, friend, employee, neighbor, parishioner, or any other ready label, per se…

I will acknowledge, however, when it come to my son with special needs, Josiah, when he was first given the PDD-NOS (atypical autism) label it lead to huge sighs of relief for myself and my husband.  That was because we were dealing with so many issues back then that Autism at least made a degree of sense and it was able to take a number of his significant behavioral anomalies under its umbrella.  It is also true now that Josiah appears to think of himself as “autistic” and he uses that label, perhaps as a shorthand code, as a blanket explanation for various aspects of his quirkiness, at least that’s how it appears to me (I am in no way pretending to speak For him)…

I have spent so much of my life seemingly on the outside of whatever the group thinks it is or what it does that it’s actually harder for me to acquiesce to the “herd mentality”, even in a church setting where people are looking to foster “unity”.  This may be a holdover of the “rugged individualism” of the traditional American ideal that I do internalize to some degree, my own individual personality & intellectual makeup that always goes into suspect analysis mode whenever everyone around me jumps on some bandwagon (or follows some pied piper toward yet another cliff), or even can be an outgrowth of having lived virtually my entire life “counter culture” (especially now that Constitutionally Conservative Christian is virtually a pariah position in this formerly free land of ours).  Perhaps being an “outsider” is enough of an identity that it’s not necessary for me personally to seek other labeling for myself.

As far as role models go, though, as a Christian the Only real role model would be Jesus Christ…and that represents a role that none of us could ever live up to!

Philippians 3:14King James Version (KJV)

14 I press toward the mark for the prize of the high calling of God in Christ Jesus.

King James Version (KJV)Public Domain

above scripture from BibleGateway.com

(image from searching Google images for the scripture…may have been a youtube screen grab..but here is the link for the image…well it wouldn’t paste the link just another image)

So, thanks for listening in…and check out the original post below that my comment following pertains to…and let’s support those amongst us who are learning to speak up and speak out and encourage them to share their hearts with all who might choose to listen and care and handle our human frailties with tenderness and truth…

Blessings,

Valerie

Autism—It’s Different in Girls

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My perspective on this is a bit different in that I am a Parent of someone on the Spectrum who was diagnosed as “PDD-NOS” (Pervasive Developmental Disorder Not Otherwise Specified, aka “atypical autism”) and we got such a “label” for our son when he was still a preschooler. He also had many other issues that were primarily medical in nature and during key points of his life these medical needs really took preeminence (2 open heart surgeries, brain tumor, liver transplant, etc).

Our seemingly biggest challenge overall was in getting the educational system to even pretend to address his Actual Needs. We had years of frustration where they absolutely refused to acknowledge his autism diagnosis (in fact they never officially Did recognize that he was on the Spectrum, though his last Special Ed Case Manager did admit the obviousness of his Autism in private conversations with me). The school system was extremely derelict in its legally mandated duties to my son and we dealt with significant frustrations in this arena for the duration of his public schooling, K-12 (ironically special ed preschool did a Great Job with him, so our frustration was mightily increased by the torments that followed).

One extremely important aspect of special education law (in the US) involves Transition Planning & Services that are required to begin no later than the year the student is to turn 16. These services are to be tailored to the individual needs of the student and should be designed to facilitate their Transition from public school to Independent Living, Post-Secondary Education, and Employment. The ideals of this approach are laid out in detail in US law (IDEA, the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act & its later “improvement”), but our experience, and likely that of many others, reveals how far short of the legal mandates/standard things are…let alone compared to what should be “ideal” (as in identifying and addressing All areas of known or suspected disability, regardless of diagnostic “labeling”)…My son was “graduated” from high school not even possessing 3rd grade math skills and his now denied Michigan’s through age 26 special education because he “graduated”. I have a cousin with two autistic sons in Arkansas and her older son also “graduated” but struggled so significantly in college that she got him tested and discovered that his reading was only at grade school level even though he had a “diploma”. I don’t know how much she fought for him educationally but I know to what incredible lengths I went to over the years all to virtually no avail…

My son’s Primary Care Doctor, who has a practice devoted to complex special needs kids & families, including a significant cohort on the Autism Spectrum shared a chilling perspective. She said that the “high-functioning” autistic kids, like my son is now (he’s been significantly lower functioning when younger) are not coming close to having their needs met here in Michigan. If they are high enough functioning to be included in regular academic settings then often their “independent living” or functional “life skills” needs often go unaddressed. Once they get out of high school they discover that “the adult services industry” is woefully inadequately prepared to address so many of their needs. Also, because the many systems are so poorly managed and financially irresponsible and/or overburdened many times kids with significant needs do not come close to getting their needs met at any point…

Given that the “higher functioning” autistic kids are probably the ones most likely to be able to “handle it” to some degree in the regular/normal/neuro-typical world it would certainly seem in society’s best interest to help give them the tools and support necessary to foster their highest level of independence while young and thereby ensure a likely increasing percentage of such kids will grow into (nearly) independent adults. This would mean the possibility of significant resource allocation during the earlier years developmentally but should hopefully result in many more of these kids not needing nearly so much public support as they likely would otherwise had such intervention not have been provided. The arguments for early and intensive intervention for Autistic Spectrum kids have surely now made that perspective widely accepted and hopefully there has been sufficient time for data gathering to bolster this view “scientifically”.

In our family’s case, we spent many years and uncountable mental, emotional, spiritual, and financial capital attempting to get our local school system to DO THEIR LEGALLY MANDATED JOB…and these requests were based on data, diagnoses, and clear evidence of myriad needs (many in keeping with autism spectrum issues)…however the real bottom line was that my son got virtually Only what the school felt like offering whether it directly addressed his needs or not. And since they absolutely refused to acknowledge or address his Autism Spectrum issues (which were known as early as 2000 and had written behavioral pediatrician’s orders) he was significantly negatively impacted by not having received these necessary (and technically IDEA mandated) services.

The cost to our family (we had four kids within four years) was/is truly incalculable. I’m not “blaming” the school for all the issues, but had they done their job there are so many things that would have gone differently. For instance my son required significant therapeutic intervention, especially when he was younger, so we would take him to PT (Physical Therapy), OT (Occupational Therapy), SLT (Speech & Language Therapy), Sensory Integration Therapy, Music Therapy (which I tried for years to get the school to provide to assist in re-mediating his Severe Learning Disability in Math), Art Therapy, Psychological Therapy, Visual Therapy, etc…We spent so much of what should have been family free time shuffling him to and from these visits and when I finally stepped back from it one year due to personal overload and burnout basically watched him deteriorate before my eyes. He should have had year round intensive intervention provided by the school but they absolutely refused to analyze or address his very real needs and declines. I actually ended up dragging all my kids to random Vacation Bible Schools over a few consecutive summers just to try to give my Special Needs Son some degree of educational structure (and all the other kids really came to resent this as they got to attend these nearby VBS’s along with their brother). There were a few years when being out of school got so upsetting for my son that he lost his toileting skills…but they immediately returned when school began. This level of distress did not concern school staff at all but it caused significant suffering for my son…and the rest of us.

Well, this obviously went on Way Longer than I intended it to. I’m so glad you are putting your voice out there and speaking up on behalf of yourself and others who may not choose to speak but whose experiences and perspectives resonate with yours. My son has come such a long way from those virtually non-verbal and overwhelming sensory distress days to having discovered himself and continuing to refine his own unique voice. Although “movie quoting” and verbatim dialogue still punctuate much of his communication he can at least now speak as himself so much more freely now than ever before.

Loving someone with autism and living with someone on the Spectrum can certainly be a challenge (and I won’t minimize the major hardships of our personal journey historically &/or presently) but it also presents a tremendous amount of joy as well. Our “special” son is really the heart of our family in so many ways. He is a constant source of entertainment and his humor is so random that it continues to surprise and amaze us all, which is a huge blessing and counterpoint to the stressors. However he also represents a personal bridge between this world and the Kingdom of God (he is a very strong & outspoken Christian)…he has seen the Face of God while undergoing his Liver Transplant and (similarly to his dad) can have a nearly conversational relationship with the Lord. I really believe that his “autism” facilitates this transparency. Just as he doesn’t know how to put a “mask” on in his human relationships, he is virtually incapable of having a barrier between himself and God. Witnessing his Christian Walk is both humbling & encouraging for those who live with him. If he struggles to talk with us earthlings there is no communication barrier with his Heavenly Father…and that is a gift that no “labeling” nor lack of supports could ever diminish!

Blessings, thanks for all you shared, and thanks for letting me “wax eloquent” too here.

Best Regards, Valerie Curren

PS, I wrote more thoughts on your article at my blog here…I’d love to hear back from you on that, if you might be interested…

https://specialconnections.wordpress.com/2016/10/11/commenting-on-autism-its-different-in-girls-so-is-adhd/

this provocative image could lead us to consider these topics further…hmm; from:

http://theemergencesite.com/AutismSpectrumMenu.html

Image result for autism adhd

Commenting on “Only the Rich will Have Rights” Article

I’ve recently decided to check out the blog, ComfortInTheMidstOfChaos.com in the hope that I will find writings that speak to me where I am currently.  This is a community of Christian Parents whose children have complex special needs.  If you’ve read anything here at Special Connections you may guess why that sounds appealing.

Because I’m basically still reeling from some very difficult, painful, unethical, and frankly illegal events surrounding my son’s education (or lack therof), I clicked on the “special education” tag at the above website.  The article below jumped out sufficiently for me to write to the author in the comments section.

See the source image

http://www.comfortinthemidstofchaos.com/2015/01/are-you-serious-awards-volume-xl-only.html

Below are my comments as shared with the above blog post, though due to the character limit they were posted there in batches.

We have just experienced the fallout of this dilemma first hand. Our 20 year old autistic (among many other issues) son “graduated” last Spring with a “diploma” though he still cannot do 3rd grade math! At the IEP near the end of the school year I (again) raised the issue of Transition Services and provided several “age appropriate transition assessments” to show areas where he still needed significant help. By the way, the school has done Zero Transition goals or services over the years even though I have asked in writing for such Legally Mandated services to be provided. They once again refused, and also refused to reconvene the IEP to address outstanding issues and my son’s need for clarification from IEP Team Members.

The bottom line is that we ended up filing a Due Process Hearing Request near the end of 2015…and I had been working on the issues related to that filing leading up to the IEP and before filing, for about 8 months preceding it. We tried to find an attorney or legal advocate including returning to the University based “poverty law center” who had assisted us a decade ago when we had been compelled to file for Due Process, again as a last resort. The law center said no; our state’s Protection & Advocacy organization said our situation was too complex (after working with us over the phone and email for a month) so no; a state level Autism Organization did basically the same thing as P & A.

We are in a lower income situation and our son is on SSI, Medicaid, and Food Stamps so he personally, a legal adult Not under guardianship, is definitely low income. I went through our state’s Bar Association (phone & web) and sent emails to every attorney listed who had Special Education expertise and also did pro bono work…no takers. We contacted another university’s disability law clinic–no. I was in the process of trying Legal Aid (who seemed unlikely to have special education expertise but would at least be free)…

Anyway, a relative offered us a sum of money that could enable us to “hire” legal advocacy for the filing of motions, oral arguments, and conducting the hearing itself. We visited this attorney’s office and he basically told us it would cost us at least $20,000 to have a lawyer see us through the Hearing, which of course (even with help) we didn’t have.

In fact, in our state (Michigan) the school district attorneys are now habitually going after families and their lawyers to get attorney fees, claiming the filings were “frivolous” even when they are clearly not. They also apparently get $100,000 insurance money from the taxpayers whenever someone files Due Process so they can pretty much Always defeat the little guy (who already has the burden of proof and a major uphill battle). The lawyer examined the school district’s lawyers’ motion to dismiss (where they either denied or ignored every issue we raised) and seeing that they hadn’t already tried to hit us up for attorney fees said he would talk with them and get the case dismissed (like he was doing us a favor by Not allowing the Significant Issues we raised in the Due Process Hearing Request get a “fair” hearing). I thought we were there to hire him to represent our son, but he talked as if we decided to proceed Josiah would be on his own in court…

The financial component of what would likely fall on our head if we proceeded, our direct attorney costs and the likelihood of being “sued” to pay for the school’s attorneys, regardless of the legitimacy of our issues really scared most of the other family members at the meeting. My husband was afraid that if we proceeded we could lose our house (though not having $20,000 meant, apparently, not proceeding at all)!

So instead of helping us with our case “our” attorney (who at least lowered his fee) appeared to never read our actual hearing request (it was nearly 40 pages long after all), nor did he review some of the supporting documentation I sent him electronically to show “proof” of what was being contended, nor to offer us any advice or analysis on the “merits” of our case, or lack thereof. Needless to say I was, and basically still am, furious. I felt as if the 15 plus years of Wrightslaw and other advocacy training and self education I’ve attained was pointless. I could have rolled over and played dead at virtually every IEP meeting we’ve had and gotten virtually the same results!

The upshot was that our disabled son was pressured to sign a “with prejudice” dismissal of the case request so that the case would just go away…and we were all supposed to be grateful that at least the school wouldn’t try to make us pay for their lawyers! How is that protecting the rights of the disabled, especially the lower income disabled (& their families)?

We had and still have extremely serious and legitimate issues, many of which have been problematic for years, some going back to 2001 when the school disregarded autism and outside (hospital based) neuropsych testing showing my son’s IQ to be “low normal” and they decided he had an IQ 30-40 points lower than the outside testing showed…put him in a class for mentally/cognitively impaired students, didn’t address his autism, denied him access to general ed in any meaningful way until our prior hearing request (which finally got him a Para Pro, which had been a doctor’s written recommendation from at least 2000), refused to re-mediate his areas of learning disabilities because they preferred to use their significantly lower iQ during the “severe discrepancy” LD era, even though his math LD met that more stringent requirement even considering the IQ they claimed he had…and many other things.

The irony is that we would probably never have pursued Due Process this time if they had been willing to Finally address his Transition Needs. I had mistakenly thought that that area got short shrift when other heath crises (like a Brain Tumor and eventual Liver Transplant) took preeminence. Apparently it was the same as always, obvious needs that would be disregarded, denied, or dismissed…

I could go on at even greater length here, and I’m sorry for going into this so much, but it is still very fresh and raw. In fact, today was to be the day the Hearing was to have happened/started. At this point I’m trying to regroup to find another way to get my son’s significant needs addressed when a system tasked with caring for these issues was extremely derelict in its duties. Given that Michigan is usually quite generous, in that it provides Special Education through age 26 (unless one “graduates”) it is even more frustrating.

My son’s doctor has said that kids that have high-functioning autism are the one who aren’t getting their needs met, not in school and definitely not in the adult services industry. If you are high enough functioning to handle the academics then they apparently completely disregard the independent living skills side of the equation. If you can’t handle the academics then the “life skills” track means you never acquire anything like a high school education. If you examine the IDEA requirements for post-secondary transition you have to wonder where the “diploma” track kids will get those issues addressed if they are busy taking the course requirements for graduation…and graduating kids without high school skills and no transition services violates the letter & spirit of IDEA!

Here’s our bottom line, too weary over the years to step our issues up to the next level after the extreme exhaustion and years of dispute that accompanied our first Due Process request (that took like 2 years to resolve, when 60 days is “required”)…overwhelmed by Brain Tumor & Liver Transplant issues that exactly overlaid the years when Transition should have been addressed (and initially when we should have confirmed that the Settlement terms from the first Due Process request were followed–they weren’t entirely). Being lied to by school staff that you don’t get functional needs met when you’re on the diploma track and being too beaten down by the IEP process (always backed up to the end of the school year so there’s no maneuverability for “procedural safeguards”) to start the battle all over again when school starts. Being unable to find virtually Any Advocacy to assist us over the years so living with the “as good as it gets” aspect of the IEP that was, from my perspective, No Good At All (and Never Legally Compliant ANY Year). When finally filing Due Process again, as a last resort, being told that because you don’t have deep enough pockets to absorb attorney fees for your son AND the school you can’t/mustn’t proceed.

And here’s the real kicker, since our son is Not under guardianship, if you cannot find an attorney to represent him then HE MUST ACT AS HIS OWN ATTORNEY. So in order to vindicate our son’s rights he must be mightily violated by the system in order to proceed. Someone on the spectrum, with communication, attentional, and processing issues will be forced to act as his own trial attorney in a hearing. He doesn’t have near the breadth of understanding of special ed law, or even his own educational history, that his mother does, but she cannot speak on his behalf! The attorney insisted that the hearing experience would virtually destroy Josiah, being made to listen to people he cares about potentially lying and saying horrible things about him (even if they didn’t believe them but in order to protect their jobs). His twin and father were convinced to “quit”…Josiah and I, not quite so much…

We are praying about where to go from here, but it is an incredible heartache to me that we cannot even, apparently, have our legitimate issues heard nor obviously afford to find someone to proceed. Now it may be that even if we found someone free who could proceed we cannot carry on because of the “with prejudice” dismissal (which apparently means cannot be brought up again and is used to dismiss a case on the merits–which were never addressed in any venue, not even our alleged “legal representative”). Being told by the attorney that if we’d come to him a year ago he could have “kicked them in the…” but now it’s basically too late. “You can’t do anything to help your son…but I really hope you’ll become an advocate to help others…you know the special ed law better than the administrative law judge who would have decided your case”…what does a parent even say to news like that?

Thanks for letting me vent, and thanks for writing about the many issues families face. I only just found your blog after reading your recent article on Rare Diseases and Not Being Alone that you published through Special Needs Parenting. I am planning to read many of your postings in my process of moving forward from this devastating disappointment.

Blessings In Christ,

Valerie Curren

PS I recently started blogging at SpecialConnections@WordPress.com and would love to have you stop by! Best Regards!

Also, I’ve been writing a medically focused CarePage.com blog mostly emphasizing Josiah’s needs for several years now, trying to cope with Brain Tumor & Liver Transplant for a while here:

http://www.carepages.com/carepages/JournalingForTheJazzman/

And my son Josiah is working on finding his own voice here:

http://www.carepages.com/carepages/JosiahTheOvercomer/

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I have not yet, until this reply, written about so many of the details of what has transpired surrounding our Due Process Hearing Request and the horrible and entirely ineffective results from attempting to assert my son’s legal protections.  If you are reading this page our family would greatly appreciate your prayers on our behalf as we seek to find a way to move forward that addresses our son’s myriad needs, redresses existing grievances (if that is even possible now), and hopefully ultimately blazes a trail so other students and families won’t have to suffer the major setbacks that have been body blows to us all.

There is Always Hope…and the Lord is still Light & Life even when all about us is seemingly darkness.  May you too find Rest, Peace, Joy (even in the midst of sorrow), Light, Love, and Hope in Him!  Blessings, Valerie

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Adding the below link on 7-16-19 I realized that our carepages blogs have ended due to the service closing.  So if anyone wants to really wade into the weeds here is where we are sharing some of our journey online:

I archived the CarePage about Josiah’s needs here:

JazzmanJournal.wordpress.com

Josiah & I archived his CarePage here (& he continues to add things):

JosiahTheSecretWeapon.wordpress.com

I continue sharing about Josiah’s journey (& the family’s to a lesser extent) here:

https://www.caringbridge.org/visit/josiahcurren

Josiah is on Facebook & Twitter; here is his twitter feed:

PPS  Here is a true tale from a bit of the other side of the equation, hopeful & healing!

https://wqth.wordpress.com/2019/02/03/make-your-house-a-sanctuary-this-spring/

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A few other posts I’ve done that touch on the theme of this post loosely:

https://specialconnections.wordpress.com/2018/08/18/complex-ptsd-personal-touchpoints/

https://specialconnections.wordpress.com/2018/09/09/special-needs-parenting-trauma-ptsd/

https://specialconnections.wordpress.com/2018/09/04/special-needs-parenting-some-ancillary-aspects-encouragements/

https://specialconnections.wordpress.com/2017/06/13/thoughts-on-i-cant-do-this-special-needs-life/

https://specialconnections.wordpress.com/2018/10/17/special-forces/

https://specialconnections.wordpress.com/2018/08/14/insights-on-spiritual-warfare/

Please let me know if anything I’ve shared blesses you.  God Bless!

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