Tag Archive | Family History

A Pleasant Peninsula–Lovely Tribute to Michigan

Source: A Pleasant Peninsula

The author of this piece drew my attention to it after seeing I’d posted her colleague’s tribute to Tennessee previously.  After checking out both of those moving tributes to beloved home states there is now another goal to add to the many endeavors I hope to pursue…to write some of my own thoughts, feelings, insights, & history about Michigan…and eventually some of the other states that represent the historical homes of my ancestors…

Well, I was hoping to grab a couple of quick goodies to give a hint of flavor that might come as I meander Michigan in my mind…but it’s going to take more work & time than I’m going to dedicate right now.  I’d wanted to include a link from CyndisList.com (a wonderful genealogy site!) to an item I read many years ago either a letter or a journal describing some early conditions in Detroit.  This may have been surrounding the 300th Anniversary of Detroit and involved more than one item.  Well, it’s going to take more digging so will have to wait for now, there was a description of plague conditions in Detroit, Native characters, and a letter describing Detroit as “the Paris of America”!…

J. J. Hagerman from bing.com image search

James John (J. J) Hagerman was one of my husband’s ancestors and his family moved to Michigan from Canada in his childhood.  He attended the University of Michigan and worked in mining in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula.  He had wide ranging interests  and developed business ventures and residences in a number of states.  Here is a link to a Wikipedia page about him, not that I endorse Wikipedia as a source, but it’s a convenient jumping off point.  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/J._J._Hagerman

I’ve wondered if “Hagerman Lake” in Michigan’s UP is connected to J. J.  Hagerman and this seems to prove that point.

It turns out that Hagerman Lake is named after J. J. Hagerman,
a very colorful miner and industrialist from the 1800’s. This is confirmed
by Jack Hill on page 39 of his history of Iron County, in which he says that
“on the earliest maps Hagerman Lake bears the name of Lac Brule. The origin
of the name Hagerman is of more recent date and in all probability came from
J. J. Hagerman, a mineral and timber investor who secured large land holdings
surrounding the lake during the early development of the County.”

from http://hagermanlake.org/?p=history

“First Ice on Hagerman- Photo by Pete W.” from the HagermanLake.org site

Well that is just a tiny tidbit about Michigan, glancing at the state from an historical perspective and my husband’s familial connections to my home state.  Of course our family was extremely excited that my husband has Maize & Blue blood too!

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from a Google.com image search for “maize & blue”

Advice for the Young and Penniless Who Want to Travel. — The Shooting Star

This is all the advice I wish someone had given me when I was sixteen.

via Advice for the Young and Penniless Who Want to Travel. — The Shooting Star

Although the age part is not applicable to me, but rather to my children…the budget part sure does apply.  When I was in High School I was a member of American Field Service (AFS), an international student exchange program and was selected to go on a Summer AFS exchange.  Unfortunately for me there was literally No Place in the Entire World that wanted me…wow.  I did get very close to the International Exchange students at my high school during my senior year, especially Monina & Edgardo from the Philippines, Astrid from Germany, and Veronique from Belgium.  Veronique & I even had fun on an outing in downtown Detroit & Greektown where I got the chance to practice my fairly rudimentary French skills in conversation with her.

I plan to return to the above blog post to check on some of the authoress’s online recommendations…and to share her insights with my more adventurous kids…and perhaps some of their friends.  My husband has done his share of armchair travelling using Google Street View and Google Earth…something I have yet to try but hope to at least apply to genealogical endeavors, as in getting a digital glimpse of an historically significant place…at least from a family history perspective eventually…Blessings, Valerie

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Bing.com image search for “the earth is the Lord’s”

Some Thoughts on “The Price That We Pay as the Keepers of the Memories”

This referenced blog posting is quite insightful and spoke to me as the author articulates an intersection between Family Historian and encounters with pain and death…which, of course, also reminds me of walking that Special Needs Tightrope…These remarks from her blog posting (see below) especially resonated!

“I am my family’s Keeper of Memories.  I pay a price because of that.  But it is a price I would pay again and again because the joy, understanding, and connections that come, outweigh the price every single day…The depth of my pain only exists because of the depth of my love and the joyful memories…”

from https://thegenealogygirl.blog/2017/06/13/the-price-that-we-pay-as-the-keepers-of-the-memories/

Also within her posting she refers to Eternal Families and has a link to share her beliefs.  I did not click that link nor read what she said on that topic, so I am not endorsing her viewpoints, as I don’t know what they are.  From my own Biblical Christian perspective I consider the concept of an “eternal family” to be applicable to the family of God, and those who are in the household of Faith.  There are many biblical passages where family is addressed, especially from the perspective of eternity.

Historically the Jews/Hebrews were/are God’s Chosen People.  Abraham was the Father of Faith, because “he believed God and it was credited unto him as righteousness.”  Later in the New Testament the process of being “grafted into the vine” or “made children of Abraham” is described as a faith journey, beyond descendancy via blood (unless you are referencing the Blood of Christ).

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Bing.com image search for “scripture gentiles grafted in”

Galatians 3:6-8 New International Version (NIV)

So also Abraham “believed God, and it was credited to him as righteousness.”[a]

Understand, then, that those who have faith are children of Abraham.Scripture foresaw that God would justify the Gentiles by faith, and announced the gospel in advance to Abraham: “All nations will be blessed through you.”[b]

Footnotes:

  1. Galatians 3:6 Gen. 15:6
  2. Galatians 3:8 Gen. 12:3; 18:18; 22:18

New International Version (NIV)Holy Bible, New International Version®, NIV® Copyright ©1973, 1978, 1984, 2011 by Biblica, Inc.® Used by permission. All rights reserved worldwide. From BibleGateway.com

 

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from a Bing.com image search for “I am the door”, in context this is Jesus speaking…

 

Jesus describes himself as The Way and The Door.  The only way to the Father is through him.  So, from my understanding, we All have the option of becoming part of the Family of God, of accepting Christ, and then sharing in eternal life.  This assurance of eternity in the Lord’s presence, and being united with loved ones in the faith provides me (and many others) great comfort when those seasons of death and loss arise.  Losing a loved one who is a Believer means only a temporary “See You Later” style of goodbye, not a permanent severing of the connection for those of us who are also in Christ!  As scripture says, “we do not sorrow as those who have no hope”.

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Bing.com Image search for “I am the way”

Here is a lengthy passage of scripture worth pondering…

Romans 11 New International Version (NIV)

The Remnant of Israel

11 I ask then: Did God reject his people? By no means! I am an Israelite myself, a descendant of Abraham, from the tribe of Benjamin.God did not reject his people, whom he foreknew. Don’t you know what Scripture says in the passage about Elijah—how he appealed to God against Israel: “Lord, they have killed your prophets and torn down your altars; I am the only one left, and they are trying to kill me”[a]?And what was God’s answer to him? “I have reserved for myself seven thousand who have not bowed the knee to Baal.”[b] So too, at the present time there is a remnant chosen by grace. And if by grace, then it cannot be based on works; if it were, grace would no longer be grace.

What then? What the people of Israel sought so earnestly they did not obtain. The elect among them did, but the others were hardened, as it is written:

“God gave them a spirit of stupor,
    eyes that could not see
    and ears that could not hear,
to this very day.”[c]

And David says:

“May their table become a snare and a trap,
    a stumbling block and a retribution for them.
10 May their eyes be darkened so they cannot see,
    and their backs be bent forever.”[d]

Ingrafted Branches

11 Again I ask: Did they stumble so as to fall beyond recovery? Not at all!Rather, because of their transgression, salvation has come to the Gentiles to make Israel envious. 12 But if their transgression means riches for the world, and their loss means riches for the Gentiles, how much greater riches will their full inclusion bring!

13 I am talking to you Gentiles. Inasmuch as I am the apostle to the Gentiles, I take pride in my ministry 14 in the hope that I may somehow arouse my own people to envy and save some of them. 15 For if their rejection brought reconciliation to the world, what will their acceptance be but life from the dead? 16 If the part of the dough offered as firstfruitsis holy, then the whole batch is holy; if the root is holy, so are the branches.

17 If some of the branches have been broken off, and you, though a wild olive shoot, have been grafted in among the others and now share in the nourishing sap from the olive root, 18 do not consider yourself to be superior to those other branches. If you do, consider this: You do not support the root, but the root supports you. 19 You will say then, “Branches were broken off so that I could be grafted in.” 20 Granted. But they were broken off because of unbelief, and you stand by faith. Do not be arrogant, but tremble. 21 For if God did not spare the natural branches, he will not spare you either.

22 Consider therefore the kindness and sternness of God: sternness to those who fell, but kindness to you, provided that you continue in his kindness. Otherwise, you also will be cut off. 23 And if they do not persist in unbelief, they will be grafted in, for God is able to graft them in again.24 After all, if you were cut out of an olive tree that is wild by nature, and contrary to nature were grafted into a cultivated olive tree, how much more readily will these, the natural branches, be grafted into their own olive tree!

All Israel Will Be Saved

25 I do not want you to be ignorant of this mystery, brothers and sisters, so that you may not be conceited: Israel has experienced a hardening in part until the full number of the Gentiles has come in, 26 and in this way[e] all Israel will be saved. As it is written:

“The deliverer will come from Zion;
    he will turn godlessness away from Jacob.
27 And this is[f] my covenant with them
    when I take away their sins.”[g]

28 As far as the gospel is concerned, they are enemies for your sake; but as far as election is concerned, they are loved on account of the patriarchs, 29 for God’s gifts and his call are irrevocable. 30 Just as you who were at one time disobedient to God have now received mercy as a result of their disobedience, 31 so they too have now become disobedient in order that they too may now[h] receive mercy as a result of God’s mercy to you. 32 For God has bound everyone over to disobedience so that he may have mercy on them all.

Doxology

33 Oh, the depth of the riches of the wisdom and[i] knowledge of God!
    How unsearchable his judgments,
    and his paths beyond tracing out!
34 “Who has known the mind of the Lord?
    Or who has been his counselor?”[j]
35 “Who has ever given to God,
    that God should repay them?”[k]
36 For from him and through him and for him are all things.
    To him be the glory forever! Amen.

Footnotes:

  1. Romans 11:3 1 Kings 19:10,14
  2. Romans 11:4 1 Kings 19:18
  3. Romans 11:8 Deut. 29:4; Isaiah 29:10
  4. Romans 11:10 Psalm 69:22,23
  5. Romans 11:26 Or and so
  6. Romans 11:27 Or will be
  7. Romans 11:27 Isaiah 59:20,21; 27:9 (see Septuagint); Jer. 31:33,34
  8. Romans 11:31 Some manuscripts do not have now.
  9. Romans 11:33 Or riches and the wisdom and the
  10. Romans 11:34 Isaiah 40:13
  11. Romans 11:35 Job 41:11

New International Version (NIV)Holy Bible, New International Version®, NIV® Copyright ©1973, 1978, 1984, 2011 by Biblica, Inc.® Used by permission. All rights reserved worldwide. From BibleGateway.com

Image result for grafted into the vine

Bing.com image search for “grafted into the vine”

Well, thanks for stopping by.  May you find the Lord to be your Savior, Healer, & Lord and may he comfort & sustain you during those seasons of sorrow…and magnify your joy as you Abide in the Vine!

Blessings,

Valerie

thegenealogygirl

PETERSON, Grandma and Grandpa with Kent kids, 1987 My siblings and I with our grandparents – Ronald and Margaret Peterson.  1987

The first time I read The Giver by Lois Lowry, I was in my late teens or early twenties attending college.  I was instantly struck by the lack of true joy that existed in the community because of the absence of historical knowledge and freedom of choice.  The stripping away of freedoms, the complete control of the environment – even the weather itself – eventually led to a deterioration in all that makes us human.  No one chose their own career, spouse, number of children, what to eat.  They took daily “vitamins” to control their sexual urges.  Children were bred and then placed with families.  Members of the community were instructed in every way.  They even lost their ability to see color.

But there was one community member who was the “Keeper of Memories”.  This community elder…

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“Touching The Past” & The Old Key

“I hope the drive to discover our family’s past also leads us to share it with close and distant family in order to pay the proper homage to generations past.”

Brass Key fancy

That quote is at the end of this lovely blog post (see below). There is so much richness in what he wrote. What a lovely personal sharing of the meaningfulness of those that have gone before us and the special treasures they have left behind through which we can also connect to them.

This post inspires me to want to go through some of my own inherited treasures, and more particularly through many of the older items that enhance The Cottage ambiance Up North…to capture their stories (as known or speculated) and to record these musings for our present edification and other’s future enlightenment.

One small “treasure” that I hope will pass down to me from my parents some distant future day is a large brass key that my grandparents found beach-combing along the shores of one of the Great Lakes (Erie?). When my dad was young he used to teethe on it.

This key represents mystery to me. It has a tangible connection to my Family of Origin but an unexplored and likely unknowable connection to the past. It very well could even be evidence of some long ago shipwreck. Also, its size suggests that it went to something significant like perhaps a large trunk or even an ancient door. Although its true origins will likely Never be known it’s more recent personal past is quite precious to me.

So now the “To Do List” needs to expand into the cataloging of personal history archival exhibits…What (at least theoretical) Fun!

Blessings,

Valerie

PS  The key image above is similar to my Dad’s key, though his is less ornate…but I really liked how it was presented in the above picture; image from this site–

http://www.bluewillowhouse.com/2015/05/28/ttt-week-38-vintage-finds/

…perhaps because I also appreciate so much of the creatively imaginative Steampunk artistic galaxy…hmm…

Moore Genealogy

Carl with the 172 year old Monty Family Bible. Carl with the 172 year old Monty Family Bible.

On our recent trip to our hometown, my wife and I were very fortunate to be able to see and hold items that once belonged and were used by my wife’s ancestors. But even more fortunate we were to learn some of the stories behind these articles. This experience helped to bring these people from mere dates in the past to real individuals who gave the breath of life to future generations. Much of this was made possible by my wife’s cousin Carl Gonya who before high school took up the mantle of the family historian. His exhaustive research into the family lines started long before the internet made things so much easier but in many cases made for shoddier research. His collection of family artifacts and pictures is impressive and the result of diligent family research.

The 172 years old…

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Commenting on yet another DNA Explained Blog posting

Below is a comment I made to another DNA Explained blog posting  in response to another commentator’s post.  My response was based on relatively recent experiences at the Gaylord, Michigan Family History Center, a local branch where genealogists can access much of the Mormon Church’s massive Family History Library’s holdings.  On the rare times I get to be in Gaylord during the week I will make a concerted effort to access the local FHC…as the ones that are closer to my home require much more travel coordination that the one near my parents’ vacation Cottage.
Here is the article that both Roger (I copied his comment below) and I were responding to:
This above blog posting gives a very thorough treatment of Ancestry.com’s DNA testing, comparing the current to the previous version.  I was given an Ancestry DNA kit relatively recently and have been reading Roberta Estes’ postings on Ancestry DNA as part of my information trajectory for when to send in our own DNA samples, hoping to avoid the upheaval expected at Ancestry as they were transitioning between their old and new test versions…fyi…Valerie

I don’t know if anyone will read this or even care, but want to express my dissatisfaction with the ‘new’ Ancestry.com way of doing business, which also carries over and severely impacts my research of 10 Ancestry DNA kits that I administer —

For the rest of my limited time on Earth (I’m 70), I’m not going to waste it on Ancestry.com phone queues that are ultimately unsatisfactory. I’m done calling you guys — you promise all and deliver nothing.

My 3-year-old cry for support with outgoing in-app messages has never been resolved. In fact, you recently closed my last Ancestry Support Case — 00155616 — without even following up by telling me why.

The last time I phoned, the lady promised me a 3 month complimentary sub when my paid one ran out. Instead, I received — “Roger, we’re sorry auto-renewal took you by surprise.
We automatically renew our membership packages to make sure our members always have access to their discoveries and family history tools. But it seems we weren’t very helpful this time. To make it up to you, we’d like to give you a chance to save 15% on your membership.” — Thanks, heaps!

You shift the burden on us users to call you, instead of allowing me to e-mail. I’ve called at least 8 times over the last year. You’re ignoring me, I guess. Is this your business strategy? Too big to fail?

Oh well, in response, I’m switching over to Geni. Sorry it had to end this way.

  • Hey Roger,

    I was recently at a small town Family History Center in Gaylord, Michigan and the manager of that center spent a significant amount of time assisting a patron via the phone and web in handling some type of problem with Ancestry (I’m not sure if that was a DNA problem, per se). She used her FHC leadership position to apply pressure to the seemingly less than helpful Ancestry employee in an attempt to resolve the patron’s problem. This service may be reflective of FHC service in other locations or an example of a lesser trafficked location’s leadership going above and beyond.

    Based on this observation may I suggest that you consider visiting a local Family History Center (you can find them from FamilySearch.org) and seeing if you may be able to get direct help in navigating treacherous Ancestry waters. That FHC manager also mentioned that (at least at that Gaylord “church”) if you joined the “church” that you automatically could/would receive a free Ancestry.com membership. From my perspective this Could mean that if one could locate Mormons that are also involved in DNA this could lead to a group that by definition works with Ancestry and likely Ancestry DNA. Hope this hint may be of some help.

    Best Regards,

    Valerie Curren

Commenting on a Genealogical Black Sheep Article

Here is yet another comment I’ve historically written to the DNA Explained blog and authoress, Roberta Estes.  It was in response to an article she wrote up about her own “black sheep” ancestor.  Such more notorious people can really make genealogical research exciting (and at times “shocking”)…These “colorful” relations can really lead to a convolutedly branched family tree…depending on the arena of their outrageous endeavors!  Below is the original article to which I replied:

Your rogue ancestor reminds me a bit of my husband’s great grandfather who was living with another woman and having several children with her while apparently still married to his (first?) son’s mother. That woman listed herself as a “widow” to him during his lifetime, perhaps to try to avoid the shame. Besides the infidelity and possible bigamy there were several incidents of apparent criminal behavior by the son and grandson. My research is so disorganized currently that I can’t put my hands on the supporting documentation easily, but the newspapers in the DC area of the time carried some very colorful tales about this group: a shooting (accidental?) by a father of his son (in the groin) and of an uncle of a nephew (in the ear), theft, con-man schemes involving jewelry & call girls, various “alias” names to disguise identity, and incarceration of a minor for unknown crimes but a pardon by the Governor of Maryland….black sheep are so interesting to follow/uproot on the family history tree!

Commenting on Genealogy Article

Since it’s been a while since I’ve felt the strength and motivation to write here at Special Connections I decided to post comments I’ve made previously on other sites as a way to easily access some of my occasional other writings…
The blog, DNA Explained, is very inspirational to me from a genealogical and scientific perspective.  There have been a number of times when I will spend seemingly “hours” on reviewing the writings there.  Roberta Estes, the authoress, is thoughtful, thorough, and articulate in a detailed manner that is never boring.  She can wade into the minutia of a topic in such a way that the lay person can gain insight into arenas normally off limits without hefty amounts of topic immersion.  She does an amazing job of bringing her own family history alive and making “genetic genealogy” more accessible to those of us with interest but lacking technical background in that arena…
The comments copied below were in response to the article here:
This article is one in her series of “52 Ancestors”, which I believe was a challenge topic put out there by another genealogist to challenge fellow genealogists to begin writing up their family history in such a way as to get their genealogy together enough to pass along the fruits of their efforts to others.  As such the challenge is to write up an ancestor each week for a year (or so it sounds).  Since this above article is for #92 Ms. Estes obviously didn’t stop at 52.  It is my hope to begin writing up such “reports” on my own genealogical endeavors in the relatively near future…and Roberta’s formatting is inspirational!
Blessings to All,
Valerie

I really enjoyed reading about your ancestors and appreciate so many details and pictures. The quilting heritage reminded me of both my grandmothers and their quilts that have become such a part of all our lives. My mom’s mom used to make a special quilt for her grandchildren for when they were getting married. She signed and dated them in one corner, which makes them even more tangible from a family history perspective. She made many quilts over the years and donated so many of them to their Lutheran Church to use in raffles and various fundraisers which helped to erect a new steeple at that church. At some point I hope to create family history pages like these you’ve shared about your family…they (and you) are an inspiration! Blessings…