Tag Archive | comments

Encouragement…

There is a genealogical blog I enjoy reading and today the author shared some shocking revelations she recently discovered about a beloved deceased parent.  Please feel free to check out her original posting (it’s not too long) and learn about the many difficult facts she is wrestling with…a cautionary tale for us all along the lines of “There but for the Grace of God go I”.  Learning about other’s profound challenges can also help us put our own difficult times into perspective and generate an attitude of thankfulness for the challenges we face in our own lives.  My comments to encourage her are in italics below…Blessings to All, Valerie

https://dna-explained.com/2017/04/01/april-fool-meltdown-thanks-to-william-sterling-estes-52-ancestors-154/#comments

valeriecurren on April 2, 2017 at 4:17 am said:

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Dear Roberta,

Thanks so much for sharing your heart rending story…what incredibly powerful & painful revelations to now have to wrestle with. We live in such a fallen, broken world, and even those we love can let us down in unimaginably cruel ways. One way I’ve come to grips with some of the pain of the past is to think of our life experiences (and the choices of our forbears, to some degree) as threads woven together into a tapestry. In this life we only ever seem to view the backside (no pun intended!) of the artist’s creation. However, the God’s-eye view/heavenly perspective is always of the other side…a completed master work of art! Those painful experiences, from our view seem as random, inappropriate threads that would surely ruin the tapestry’s beauty…but God Himself, the Master Weaver, takes what the Enemy meant for evil, and brings out profound good for those of us that love Him!

Regardless of your father’s seeming failures one thing he surely got right…he helped to bring about your existence in this world!!! Certainly your life and the beauty, joy, and inspiration you bring to others are more than enough justification for his complicated existence….Please take your time to “process” these new revelations and when you are ready plow ahead into this new as yet unexplored territory…covering your journeys with prayer, peace, and grace.

Blessings,

Valerie Curren

 

Image result for scripture encouragement

Bing.com image search for Scripture Encouragement

Crock Pot Pork & Apple Rice Creation

So, for the record, I don’t really enjoy cooking…but of course eating is a treat!  We had a decent amount of pork chops left from a warehouse store purchase and as my husband is out of town (he would normally grill these chops) I needed to come up with a reasonable cooking option (grilling is definitely Not my forte!)…an old family recipe came to mind but since I couldn’t locate my copy of this recipe it was time to pursue the hunt online.

Here are some of the recipes that were going to be possible jumping off points, though at this point they are all runners up since the main dish below was the eventual inspiration for this culinary creativity…so hopefully this will end up being a decent meal for us tonight!

note: there’s a brief “Beef Burgundy” bonus recipe in the comments below too…

Runner Up Recipes for future food foibles & reference:

https://www.reference.com/food/make-pork-chop-rice-casserole-slow-cooker-bc469997a8b596f0?qo=cdpArticles

http://southernfood.about.com/od/porkchops/r/bl40318x.htm

http://www.cooks.com/recipe/6x7ft4l0/pork-chop-apple-casserole.html

http://www.kraftrecipes.com/recipes/pork-chop-apple-casserole-50350.aspx

http://www.cooks.com/recipe/km8xl0x1/pork-chop-casserole.html

http://www.cooks.com/recipe/2p4p122t/pork-chop-rice-casserole.html

http://www.yummly.co/recipes?q=baked%20sausage%20with%20apples&&noUserSettings=true

Reading through the above recipes reminded me that cooking is really an inexact process (I have a science background and can be drawn to precision in some arenas).  Combining multiple recipes has enabled me to successfully create my own unique version of a dish with relatively decent success previously, like when I used about a half dozen recipes as reference to get to a lasagna dish that did not require the noodles to be precooked.  If I could have found my little recipe book, from before I was married, this little current adventure wouldn’t have happened, as I would have just adapted that original dish, so once again necessity has made this mother into an inventor!

Image result for necessity is the mother of invention

image from this site, found via a Bing.com image search:

http://www.quotespedia.info/

(I couldn’t get the full URL to paste without just showing the image…)

…but this is also pretty true of me too…

Image result for necessity is the mother of invention

I used the main recipe below as an inspiration then modified it as noted in the comments section of the website:

I found this recipe while searching the web for a recipe similar to one in our family known as “Sausage Apple Bake” (I believe).  This was a one dish oven prepared meal with Pork sausage rolled into balls, apples, carrots, and rice.  I was wanting to use some pork chops, apples, carrots, rice, and onions in a one dish meal that would be similar but couldn’t find any online recipes near to the one from my family.  

The recipe at this website seemed like a good inspiration for cooking creativity using what was available in my kitchen…and it had the added bonus of being a crock pot recipe which is desirable to me since the cooking time is flexible and allows us to have a (hopefully) great dinner without stressing out in the kitchen after a long day.

Here’s how I prepared my version (and since it’s currently cooking the results are pending).  Inspired by my grandma, who often creatively used various leavings in her kitchen to make amazing dishes (using things up is my speed, but there’s no claim here to being an amazing cook–that’s more my husband’s speed!) I added a couple of things randomly available to use them up:

I set the crock pot on high while I prepared items then when everything was in the pot dialed it back to low.

Coated the bottom of the crock pot with some Olive Oil

Layered 1/2 of diagonally sliced carrots (2 large ones used)

1/2 of a medium sliced onion

1/2 cup rice

3 pork chops covered with 1/2 of a dried French Onion Soup mix

another 1/2 cup rice

1 sliced cored apple

repeat pork chops & soup mix

another 1/2 cup rice

another sliced cored apple

repeat carrots & onion

2 pork chops (there were more in the package than expected)

about one Tablespoon of barbecue sauce smeared over the meat

garlic salt & pepper on the top meat layer only

some red wine…a generous half cup, about

about 3 cups of water 

…Since so many of the comments above complained about the rice texture I layered it in the pot to hopefully infuse the flavor throughout this grain but tried to short the liquid a bit attempting to avoid the mushiness of some others’ results.

Hopefully this will turn out to be a hit with the family!

image found via Bing.com image search…original site is at parade.com

By the way, on several occasions I have made a similar crock pot recipe to this original one, only as a form of “Beef Burgundy”.  For that one I usually start with a can or two of mushrooms (or fresh ones if available) using the liquid to replace some of the water.  The meat is some type of beef (or occasionally venison) roast that gets an entire packet of French Onion Soup Mix sprinkled on it.  Then a can of Cream of Mushroom Soup and a Soup Can of Burgundy or another red wine (I’ve made this recipe with chicken and white wine too) with a second soup can of liquid, starting with mushroom “juice” and completed with the wine.  Depending on what’s available in the house I may add fresh onions, garlic, and/or celery to the pot too and some pepper or other seasonings to taste.

This dinner is always a Huge Hit with the entire family and we usually serve it over mashed potatoes, though it also goes well over noodles or rice presumably.  The gravy is super flavorful and the meat falls off the bones to the degree that it rarely needs cutting.  It’s so easy to make and likely time & energy friendly when cooked in the crock pot rather than a conventional oven.

Thanks for posting this recipe…and for the chance to share feedback at your website!

For what it’s worth…I searched for an online image to approximate the new Pork & Apple Rice recipe creation but found nothing very close, but the Beef Burgundy picture above is fairly close to how our version can look–Delish!

UPDATE: VERDICT

Well this didn’t turn out nearly as well as I’d hoped, partially for cooking it too long waiting for family delayed so I’m not sure how much that extra time was a factor.

Like many of the commentators on the source recipe below, the rice texture was problematic for me…it was quite mushy…perhaps due to too much liquid, too much cooking time, or the general poor quality of crock pot rice (in my device?)…needs more data to tease this out.

There was too much grease within the entire mixture, so trimming off most of the excess fat and/or pre-browning the pork chops may have improved this.

The apples were nearly tasteless so really didn’t enhance the dish at all…not sure what variety of apple might have done better here.

The onions, which were cut in long thin slices needed to be completely separated by cutting off more of the base.

The seasoning was inadequate for this dish…likely because there was much more meat than in the original inspirational recipe below.  Since I have often over seasoned things previously (and a family member needs to reduce salt intake) I was erring on the side of caution.

The wine, which was a very noticeable scent during early cooking was nearly undetectable, so not sure how well it enhanced or detracted from this particular trial.

The meat, though not sufficiently seasoned, was of a fine texture and really did fall off of the bones.  This was the highlight of the whole conglomeration.

If I were to attempt anything even remotely similar again I would likely not cook the rice in the crock pot if I wanted anything like normal textured results.  Also it would be prudent to review further comments on similar recipes to see if guidance could be gleaned.

If I were to star my current attempt as is it would likely be a 2 1/2 stars…sub-par…

Slow Cooker Pork Chops And Rice  #50399

A creamy one-dish crock pot meal made with pork chops, rice, onion soup mix, and cream of mushroom soup.

photo of Pork Chops And Rice

ingredients

4 pork chops, or pork steaks
1 cup rice, uncooked
1 envelope onion soup mix
1 can (10.75 ounce size) cream of mushroom soup
2 cups water

directions

If desired, brown the pork chops in a skillet first. 

Add the rice to the crock pot. Sprinkle with 1/3 of the onion soup mix. Evenly place the pork chops over the top or the rice. Spoon the mushroom soup over the pork, then sprinkle the remaining onion soup mix over that. Pour the water over the top. 

Cover, cook on low for 8-10 hours or until done. 

Optional: add one can of sliced mushrooms (drained) on top of the chops.



added by

sheliahryan

nutrition

508 calories21 grams fat48 grams carbohydrates29 grams protein per serving.
from this website:

Christianity & Judaism–“One in the Olive Tree!”

I recently read a provocative posting about the conversion of a well known atheistic Jew to Christianity…a criticism of the book bearing the testimony of this faith discovery written by a learned Rabbi, who periodically writes for PJMedia.com.  Within the the lively and unfortunately contentious comments section was the below gem…worth further pondering, in my opinion…

I believe this is an historical symbol used by Jewish believers in Jesus…image is from:

http://www.israeltoday.co.il/NewsItem/tabid/178/nid/29231/Default.aspx

This person’s analysis and perspective on the early genesis (excuse the pun!) of Christianity is well thought out and respectfully presented.  I do not have direct personal knowledge of many of the “facts” presented here but I share this person’s writings so that further dialogue, research, and introspection could follow on from this.

As such, to briefly state my current perspective on this topic, I think the very best version of a faith heritage would (likely) be someone who was raised in the traditional Jewish faith and later on came to the “completed” knowledge of Jesus and their personal Lord. Savior, AND Messiah!  I guess even better would be to be raised in a Messianic Jewish household replete with the beauty of the Historical Traditions of Judaism and the fullness of the knowledge of the completeness of the work of the Cross by our King of Kings and Lord of Lords.  It is truly an extreme historical irony that the early leaders of “The Way”–which later became known as Christianity–argued amongst themselves as to whether or not one had to first become a Jew before becoming a Christian…as in being a Christian (in their minds) actually required someone to be a Jew first.  Now the opposite distortion seems to be in play, in order to accept that Jesus is the (Jewish) Messiah you cannot be a Jew, for such a belief negates your very Jewishness–Wow!

In my personal history there is a loose degree of connection to this topic, at least from a theoretical perspective; my own mother was adopted as an infant and the desire to learn about that unknown heritage was (and continues to be) a key motivating factor in my initial interest in Genealogy (before this pastime’s unique additive tendencies took over!).  It is still my hope that eventually my genealogical endeavors will unearth factual Jewish blood in my background (among many other as yet uncovered inherited enhancements of genetic/cultural/historical/racial/geographical etc facets)…even if I never am blessed with that overt cultural biological heritage.  I am so thankful to have been “grafted” into the vine and to be a child of Abraham, by virtue of Faith, if not also by flesh…

I have on several occasions enjoyed teachings by Messianic Rabbis both on the radio and in person.  The richness of the cultural heritage of the Jews is something many of us raised in the Gentile Christian faith cannot really come close to fathoming.  I’ve even said on a number of occasions that it would be amazing for someone as a believer in Yeshua (Jesus) to be able to be fully immersed in some aspects of Jewish cultural tradition, like Hebrew school.  Having attended a Seder (Passover) event hosted by Messianic Jews I found the experience incredibly faith enriching…especially as the host was unashamed to draw our attention to the clear parallels/foreshadowing of traditional Christian beliefs hidden within so many aspects of this treasured historical and traditional observance.

In an ideal world All believers in the One True God of Abraham, Isaac, & Jacob as well as Moses, David, Solomon, Job, and the Biblical Prophets would recognize the Way, the Truth, and the Life that is available for ALL in Our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ!

So enjoy the comment below…and feel free to check out the original article (at the link below) too…The comment was copied in its entirety with no editing on my part…and please if anyone chooses to comment here on this posting be considerate of others in how your phrase things since this is an obviously complex & controversial topic…

https://pjmedia.com/faith/2016/09/21/andrew-klavans-great-good-thing/?singlepage=true

Rabbi Zarmi,

Respectfully, one ought not say that “Christianity is based upon the three synoptic gospels.” That is very much like saying that “Judaism is based upon Leviticus.”

Christianity is based upon the teaching given by Jesus to those “apostles” upon whom Jesus conferred authority, divine assistance, and an explicit mission, to:

1. spread his teaching; and,
2. welcome persons of every nation and tribe into his “kingdom”

To “The Twelve” (with a companion named Matthias replacing Judas Iscariot who betrayed him after the latter died), Jesus promised divine assistance, such that “what [they] bound on earth was bound in heaven, and what they loosed on earth was loosed in heaven.”

He also gave them a liturgical act to be performed as a kind of Temple service parallel to that of priests serving in the Temple. The early Jewish Christians called it the todah or Thanksgiving Offering; the later Greek Christians translated this as “Eucharist.” This act was, all at once, supposed to be Jesus’ reworking of the pascha and a todah and even the korbanot ofYom Kippur and Sukkot, remodeled into a single sacrifice in which the death of Jesus himself was to be endlessly re-encountered through the ages “in an unbloody way.”

In creating this liturgical act, Jesus washed the feet of Simon Peter and the others that they might “have a share in [him],” after the fashion of the Levites whose “share” is G_d. And Jesus commanded them to do this sacrifice “in remembrance” (Gk: anamnesis; Hb: azkarah/zikkaron). In this way Jesus intended to culminate all the sacrificial life of Israel in himself, and to make it the center of the life of the Messianic Kingdom.

Furthermore, although Jesus claimed that he came for “the lost sheep of Israel” (not, mind you, merely Judah; but all Israel), he then told his authorized teachers (the Twelve and the Seventy Two) that he had made them judges in his expanding “tribe of G_d” and royal stewards for his “kingdom of G_d” and told them: “Go into all the world making disciples of all the nations, teaching them whatever I have commanded you, and baptizing them” — the latter being his selected “adoption rite” for entering the covenant people of G_d, parallel to circumcision for the Jew.

Now, none of that involved writing anything down.

Christians call the body of teaching which Jesus gave to those whom he sent out (“apostles”) the “Apostolic Deposit of Faith.”

The 27 books which early Christians called “the memoirs of the apostles” and modern Christians call “the New Testament” are, for Christians, writings which bear witness to the life of Jesus and the initial giving of the Apostolic Deposit of Faith.

I apologize for the length of this (I’m almost done!).

I offer you this clarifying information, Rabbi Zarmi, because I think you and I have corresponded previously here in the comboxes on PJmedia, and I remember you as someone willing to make an effort to not mis-characterize things.

For Christians, Christianity is the Apostolic Deposit of Faith. When Christians divide amongst themselves and disagree on religious matters it is because one group is asking, “Is Doctrine XYZ really part of the deposit of faith?” and another is saying, “Yes” and then the two are disagreeing about who, if anyone, has authority to say that it is or isn’t.

Serious, “orthodox” Christians all hold that Paul of Tarsus and Matthew and Luke and John and James and Peter were allteaching exactly the same deposit, whether by spoken witness or in writing. But all their writings differ in flavor because they were written…
(a.) by different persons,
(b.) in different genres,
(c.) for different audiences,
(d.) to address different needs and topics.

Therefore, it would be an error to (for example) hold that John’s gospel was teaching a different thing from those of Matthew, Mark or Luke; or that Paul’s writings teach a different thing from the gospels; or that the letter of James represented some kind of contrary teaching to Paul.

And consequently one can’t really say Christianity is “based on” a subset of these books, or even all of them together. For the Christian, those books are “based on” the person of Jesus and the teaching he wanted transmitted.

I think the dialogue between Rabbi Jacob Neusner and the Catholic Josef Ratzinger who became Pope (now Pope Emeritus) Benedict XVI is the most instructive on this topic.

See: http://chiesa.espresso.repubbl…

Hopefully I”ll be able to locate the lyrics and music to a very appropriate song…

Jew and Gentile
by Joel Chernoff

Album: The Restoration of Israel
by Joel Chernoff


Jew and Gentile, one in Messiah,
One in Yeshua, one in the olive tree.
Jew and Gentile, one in Messiah,
One in Yeshua’s love.

Help us Father, to love one another,
With humble hearts, Forgiving each other,
Heal our wounds, bind us together,
So the world might believe.

One in Yeshua’s love,
One in Yeshua’s love,
One in Yeshua’s love,
Sing it all together.

These lyrics are from this site (we have this song on a CD “The Road to Jerusalem”):

http://www.invubu.com/music/show/song/Joel-Chernoff/Jew-and-Gentile.html

and this should lead to the music on youtube, hopefully…Enjoy!