Tag Archive | commenting

Commenting on a Transplant Tale

I’m still coming to grips with a sea of emotions in relation to my son’s Liver Transplant (among many other medical, educational, and interpersonal issues surrounding his life and my intense involvement in caring for his myriad needs) so it is always with a bit of trepidation that I approach other’s stories about the Transplant Journey.  This arena represents a potential emotional hand grenade for me personally & it’s never certain what might cause the pin’s removal leading to potentially devastating internal destruction.

The article below was impacting enough that I just felt compelled to write a comment afterwards, which I wanted to document here and share with my readers and also give myself a known repository of this particular topic in case I want to return to this article again…like for inspiration to gear up for when we finally contact the “Gift of Life” organ registry to attempt a contact with the donor family to express our deepest gratitude.

Such a contact has thus far remained beyond my personal ability to approach except in the most theoretical terms.  It’s hard to know where to begin in expressing the deep gratitude for the life-giving sacrificial gift this other family has provided.  We spent so much time while waiting for the Transplant in prayer for the family and the donor, asking that the Lord would be involved in all their lives, that they would each have a saving knowledge of Him, that there would be such wonderful memories made and no regrets for things left unsaid or undone with the donor.  Contemplating the eventual loss of such a loved one was almost more than I could bear.  What do you say when the Liver Transplant doctor says that your son’s “ideal candidate would be a 12 year old gun shot victim”.  I was more overwhelmed by  the other family’s impending loss than I was by our own upheaval as we awaited this amazing and generous Gift of Life.

Complicating such contemplations is the nature of my son’s complex medical status.  Some staff on the Transplant Team mentioned that in some locales they wouldn’t even offer a transplant to someone as complex as my son (the implication being that his autism or other atypicalities, not necessarily medical in nature, may have lead to a form of disability discrimination against him).  How will this other family feel when they discover that their child’s Liver Recipient is disabled in myriad ways?  What if God has yet to have answered some of the prayers noted above and this family is in a spiritual desert and cannot grasp the value of my son’s life because of his disabilities?  What if learning about who has received their child’s liver they are even more devastated by who/what he is and this adds immeasurably to their grief, pain, and loss?  Should I spearhead the effort to contact them and generate conversations periodically within our family, or at Liver Transplant Clinic Visits (we have another bi-annual one next week), to help prepare us, or should I wait for God to so move on my son, husband, or other family members?  Should I be the one to make the contact or should my son (who has various communication challenges but is incredibly gifted in spiritual insight and compassion) attempt this solo?

Just writing some of these lingering questions down reminds me that this is a process that needs to be bathed in prayer.  I need to reach some place of peace and serenity so that regardless of the donor family’s experience/reception we will feel “persuaded” in our ultimate approach in contacting them.

Any of you reading this that know the Lord please lift us up in prayer as we continue to process and prepare to eventually make contact via Gift of Life and express our Thanksgiving for this family’s Gift of Life to our son!  We don’t want to be among the 9 lepers who didn’t return to thank the Lord for the healing…

Image result for 10 lepers

image from bing.com image search

Image result for luke 17:11-19

image from bing.com image search

image from bing.com image search original from blogspot.com

Please consider reading the original story of this group of Transplant Recipients meeting the mother of the Gift of Life donor…what testimonies!

Here is the link to the original article:

https://gma.yahoo.com/face-transplant-organ-recipients-meet-donors-mother-first-181313919.html

Face Transplant and Organ Recipients Meet Donor’s Mother for the First Time (ABC News)

Here are my comments left at the above article’s website:

This story is profoundly moving to me as the mother of a liver transplant recipient. My son was a teenager while going through the transplant process and as a strong Christian was prepared to possibly die if the surgery was unsuccessful. (Before his transplant operation he wanted to tell the surgical team “If I die during the surgery don’t be sad because I’m ready to go home and be with Jesus”–wow). As a young man on the Autism Spectrum he had a hard time understanding that for him to receive the needed whole liver a donor would have to die, so he initially thought he would be murdering someone to get their liver. We had to reassure him that it was ultimately God who would decide who lives and dies and it would all be in His hands…we were not causing the other family’s desperate scenario…

One way my son was comforted in being the recipient of the Gift of Life from someone whose life was cut short was that we agreed before his procedure that if he didn’t survive we would be sure to donate all of his usable organs and tissues so that others would also receive such life-sustaining gifts from him. In fact, while we were waiting for “his” liver we were contacted by the Liver Transplant Team to be prepared as a back-up recipient for another “perfect liver”, a seemingly unprecedented event. At that time another child was higher up on the Transplant List but was so ill that it was possible that they wouldn’t survive the procedure and my son who was to be “waiting on deck” would then get that other liver. This situation was just so unbearable for me personally, thinking that already one family was losing a child for my son to receive a liver was already overwhelming, and it would be incredibly devastating that TWO people would die so that my son would benefit. We called family together and beseeched the Lord in fervent prayer on behalf of this other child…and thankfully they (apparently) survived the surgery and were still doing well more than a year later when my son finally received his transplant. Being involved in a Transplant situation is deeply moving, challenging, and ultimately a lifelong journey of discovery.

Thank the Lord for those brave and generous families who choose to give the Gift of Life during their own season of heartbreaking loss and bereavement!

After checking back at the original article here is a reply to my comment that may have been written by someone who is professionally involved with transplants, and this is such an encouragement to me as it may be representative of other’s perspectives:

  • Avatar
  • these are the stories that make participating in an organ harvest so rewarding. One family’s loss can lead to so many benefits for other families, it is unfathomable. However, the pain, the heartache the loss is so palpable, during our surgical timeout the donor identified…the directed donations are identified as well as research donations. These are huge and incredible gifts

 

 

 

 

Advertisements

Commenting on “Caught in the Act of Bad Parenting”

“Now I’m a single mom who feels emotionally and financially tapped out raising a kid with a rare medical condition. Adding to the stress, my child has ADHD and ODD, which can’t be solved with a pill…”

This  quote is from the below posting (check it out)

https://lipstickandplaydates.wordpress.com/2016/09/11/caught-in-the-act-of-bad-parenting/

where a mom bares her heart.  It’s not easy to be this transparent with our struggles, so I really wanted to encourage her.  I’ve personally felt such tremendous isolation so many times in the process of trying to raise a special needs child and that’s while having an intact marriage and supportive husband backing and shoring me up along the way.  Either way I can’t imagine enduring such a challenging journey alone and how incredibly painful and overwhelming that  process likely is.

COMFORT IN SUFFERING? O yes! I hope you will share my joy over this precious scripture and make it one of your favorites too. I know it seems hard to feel like God gives comfort in suffering, but He promises to do so, and I have felt the comfort before, so I know He will give it again.:

The scripture image above comes from this site:

 

I hope (and pray) that the Lord is making Himself tangibly available to her and that she (& all of us bearing the burden of Special Needs Parenting) are experiencing that “Peace that passes understanding” and the “comfort in [our] suffering” that only the Lord provides.

Blessings to All,

Valerie

Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Thanks for being so real here. May God give you Grace & Strength…and glimmers of Hope when you most need them. I don’t know if parents without special needs kids will ever really “get” what all of us in the (typically un-chosen by us but Chosen by God) club of Special Needs Parenting have learned, what pretty much goes without saying. There aren’t really enough words to come close to articulating the loss, despair, terror, anger, confusion, frustration, triumphs, hopes, dreams, persevereance, faith, and even Joy in the Midst of Sorrow that seem ubiquitous to our experience.

I have many times found comfort, encouragement, and inspiration in the writings and stories of other special needs families…here’s one place where I have personally found such special sustenance again & again…

http://specialneedsparenting.net/

Please Hang in There–You are NOT Alone! Blessinegs, Valerie Curren

I just realized the date you originally posted this, 9/11–the 15th Anniversary of that tragic turning point of a day. Not everyone outside of NYC has forgotten (some of us Never will!)…my special son in particular is very mindful of the tragedy of that brutal assault of a day. We continue to Remember, Reflect, and Revisit those events so that we can honor the memories of the lost, exalt (and hope to emulate) the heroism of the brave, and continue to pray for Comfort, Peace, and Closure (if that’s even possible) for the bitter, bereaved, and broken…in Christ, Valerie Curren

Image result for 9/11 scripture images

The image above is from this site:

http://www.crosscards.com/cards/patriotic/9-11-memoriam/

 

 

“Touching The Past” & The Old Key

“I hope the drive to discover our family’s past also leads us to share it with close and distant family in order to pay the proper homage to generations past.”

Brass Key fancy

That quote is at the end of this lovely blog post (see below). There is so much richness in what he wrote. What a lovely personal sharing of the meaningfulness of those that have gone before us and the special treasures they have left behind through which we can also connect to them.

This post inspires me to want to go through some of my own inherited treasures, and more particularly through many of the older items that enhance The Cottage ambiance Up North…to capture their stories (as known or speculated) and to record these musings for our present edification and other’s future enlightenment.

One small “treasure” that I hope will pass down to me from my parents some distant future day is a large brass key that my grandparents found beach-combing along the shores of one of the Great Lakes (Erie?). When my dad was young he used to teethe on it.

This key represents mystery to me. It has a tangible connection to my Family of Origin but an unexplored and likely unknowable connection to the past. It very well could even be evidence of some long ago shipwreck. Also, its size suggests that it went to something significant like perhaps a large trunk or even an ancient door. Although its true origins will likely Never be known it’s more recent personal past is quite precious to me.

So now the “To Do List” needs to expand into the cataloging of personal history archival exhibits…What (at least theoretical) Fun!

Blessings,

Valerie

PS  The key image above is similar to my Dad’s key, though his is less ornate…but I really liked how it was presented in the above picture; image from this site–

http://www.bluewillowhouse.com/2015/05/28/ttt-week-38-vintage-finds/

…perhaps because I also appreciate so much of the creatively imaginative Steampunk artistic galaxy…hmm…

Moore Genealogy

Carl with the 172 year old Monty Family Bible. Carl with the 172 year old Monty Family Bible.

On our recent trip to our hometown, my wife and I were very fortunate to be able to see and hold items that once belonged and were used by my wife’s ancestors. But even more fortunate we were to learn some of the stories behind these articles. This experience helped to bring these people from mere dates in the past to real individuals who gave the breath of life to future generations. Much of this was made possible by my wife’s cousin Carl Gonya who before high school took up the mantle of the family historian. His exhaustive research into the family lines started long before the internet made things so much easier but in many cases made for shoddier research. His collection of family artifacts and pictures is impressive and the result of diligent family research.

The 172 years old…

View original post 500 more words

Commenting on “Autism it’s Different in Girls” (& so is ADHD)

looking for images with this post…here’s a great Pinterest site

I recently read an intriguing blog post by someone who has autism but chooses to remain Anonymous…hopefully there will be many other nuggets to mine in her blog as well as the interesting comments sections filled with feedback & unique perspectives.

I had wanted (in my comments below) to go into the girls aspect of Autism and mention how there may be a continuum between Autism and ADHD…I’d read a book a few years back that laid out a good scientific case for this insight.  Later, while doing massive amounts of research for Josiah’s special education needs/case I read a number of things that talked about ADHD and how it presents in females…and in particular how there are some mothers of kids with ADHD (and/or autism?) who were never diagnosed themselves but see so many of their “issues” reflected in their kids struggle…apparently to the point that this is a “thing” that gets some degree of recognition in certain circles.

(ironically, while looking for images found these “circles” supporting my views!)

Autism: Different, Not Less:

(from the above Pinterest board…and almost every item ascribed to my son)

Just a few of the many disorders associated with ADHD. Many have similar symptoms and impairments. Getting the correct diagnosis is further confused by the high morbidity rates associated with ADHD. (View only)                                                                                                                                                      More:

the image above is from this pinterest page

I’ve meant to look back on this topic for my own “edification” but have been mightily depleted by the Special Ed case and fallout that it just hasn’t happened yet.  In our family of 6, 4 have officially been diagnosed with ADHD, & the two that haven’t (myself and Brandon, Josiah’s twin brother) exhibit quite a few of the ADHD traits (but perhaps not enough to rise to the clinical level of diagnosis…but then again who’s actually asking to be “officially” labeled)…so we think we probably both have some part of ADHD, at a minimum.  So if the continuum theory holds water, could it be that people that have ADHD are on the (potentially) mild end of the Autism Spectrum?

It’s so hard to really say and it may in large part depend on who you ask and what their personal practice emphasis (if you only have a hammer then everything looks like a nail and all!) might be…It is supported in research, I believe, that many times the parents of kids on the Spectrum have many of those traits themselves.  Certainly when “we” were growing up awareness of Autism “Spectrum” issues was nowhere near the level it is at now.  Also, if it is shown that there is any level of a genetic component to Autism and/or ADHD it would stand to reason that these things would run in families to some degree.

In my own family, from a retrospective perspective there could be arguments made that both my parents have possessed some traits of ADHD, especially when younger.  At least one of my brothers had many such traits when young and his son was also officially diagnosed with ADHD.  My other brother has a couple of kids that seem to have a lot of such traits too.  My husband wasn’t diagnosed with ADHD until adulthood, but it surely negatively impacted his academic trajectory when younger, even though he has learned to “compensate” for the ADHD issues as an adult, as have most of our kids.

Most everyone in my present family has some degree of sensory issue and we all possess varying degrees of emotional vulnerability, but thankfully this trait is at least somewhat intermittent in most of us!  Could these also be evidence of the “Spectrum” Continuum?

The author of the Autism in Girls post speculates on how important it is to find out what is going on with you and to get that diagnostic label (paraphrasing without re-reading her actual words…so I could already be distorting inadvertently her view) and therefore enable some degree of an “Autistic Identity”.  This apparently resonates with a lot of her readers, at least those who have posted comments.  It’s possible that she  draws in these more “anonymously autistic” people by the very nature of the type of blog she writes, as in people who are on the Spectrum, but can “fake it” sufficiently for the outside world to not know they are autistic…

It’s hard for me to relate to the “need” to find an identity, like in Autism.  And frankly I really do not “get” that aspect of our current culture that seems to think one has to discover a “role model” to emulate in order to aspire to things that no one “like me” has ever done before.  This will likely be controversial, and even offensive to some (sorry)–but Obama being “President” of the US should not really make it any more of less easy for any other “black” person to be the President…if the job was about the merits of the individual aspiring to the position (and who could argue that this election year!) and not about someone’s “identity”…and if he had actually obtained such a job based on his own merits (which he manifestly did Not do based on his abysmally thin resume)–no “white” man with his background, (lack of) accomplishments, known dangerous associates, and incredibly thin skin would have ever gotten near to the place of getting his finger on “the button”…but I digress…

Anyway, I don’t fully get why so many people feel the need to find such a label and thereby get some type of identity by identifying with a group.  Obviously, for anyone who knows me very well, I have spent much of my life in isolation, going against the flow, and refusing to join into whatever “group” (like Groucho Marx I wouldn’t be a member of any group that would have me!)…so the herd mentality is far from appealing to me personally.

I do, however, take a measure of identity from my personal faith…as in I’ve considered myself a strong Christian for the bulk of my life and that remains my primary identity…but I am much more likely to think of myself as a person (even as an intellect) than as a woman, wife, mother, daughter, sister, friend, employee, neighbor, parishioner, or any other ready label, per se…

I will acknowledge, however, when it come to my son with special needs, Josiah, when he was first given the PDD-NOS (atypical autism) label it lead to huge sighs of relief for myself and my husband.  That was because we were dealing with so many issues back then that Autism at least made a degree of sense and it was able to take a number of his significant behavioral anomalies under its umbrella.  It is also true now that Josiah appears to think of himself as “autistic” and he uses that label, perhaps as a shorthand code, as a blanket explanation for various aspects of his quirkiness, at least that’s how it appears to me (I am in no way pretending to speak For him)…

I have spent so much of my life seemingly on the outside of whatever the group thinks it is or what it does that it’s actually harder for me to acquiesce to the “herd mentality”, even in a church setting where people are looking to foster “unity”.  This may be a holdover of the “rugged individualism” of the traditional American ideal that I do internalize to some degree, my own individual personality & intellectual makeup that always goes into suspect analysis mode whenever everyone around me jumps on some bandwagon (or follows some pied piper toward yet another cliff), or even can be an outgrowth of having lived virtually my entire life “counter culture” (especially now that Constitutionally Conservative Christian is virtually a pariah position in this formerly free land of ours).  Perhaps being an “outsider” is enough of an identity that it’s not necessary for me personally to seek other labeling for myself.

As far as role models go, though, as a Christian the Only real role model would be Jesus Christ…and that represents a role that none of us could ever live up to!

Philippians 3:14King James Version (KJV)

14 I press toward the mark for the prize of the high calling of God in Christ Jesus.

King James Version (KJV)Public Domain

above scripture from BibleGateway.com

(image from searching Google images for the scripture…may have been a youtube screen grab..but here is the link for the image…well it wouldn’t paste the link just another image)

So, thanks for listening in…and check out the original post below that my comment following pertains to…and let’s support those amongst us who are learning to speak up and speak out and encourage them to share their hearts with all who might choose to listen and care and handle our human frailties with tenderness and truth…

Blessings,

Valerie

Autism—It’s Different in Girls

Your comment is awaiting moderation.

My perspective on this is a bit different in that I am a Parent of someone on the Spectrum who was diagnosed as “PDD-NOS” (Pervasive Developmental Disorder Not Otherwise Specified, aka “atypical autism”) and we got such a “label” for our son when he was still a preschooler. He also had many other issues that were primarily medical in nature and during key points of his life these medical needs really took preeminence (2 open heart surgeries, brain tumor, liver transplant, etc).

Our seemingly biggest challenge overall was in getting the educational system to even pretend to address his Actual Needs. We had years of frustration where they absolutely refused to acknowledge his autism diagnosis (in fact they never officially Did recognize that he was on the Spectrum, though his last Special Ed Case Manager did admit the obviousness of his Autism in private conversations with me). The school system was extremely derelict in its legally mandated duties to my son and we dealt with significant frustrations in this arena for the duration of his public schooling, K-12 (ironically special ed preschool did a Great Job with him, so our frustration was mightily increased by the torments that followed).

One extremely important aspect of special education law (in the US) involves Transition Planning & Services that are required to begin no later than the year the student is to turn 16. These services are to be tailored to the individual needs of the student and should be designed to facilitate their Transition from public school to Independent Living, Post-Secondary Education, and Employment. The ideals of this approach are laid out in detail in US law (IDEA, the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act & its later “improvement”), but our experience, and likely that of many others, reveals how far short of the legal mandates/standard things are…let alone compared to what should be “ideal” (as in identifying and addressing All areas of known or suspected disability, regardless of diagnostic “labeling”)…My son was “graduated” from high school not even possessing 3rd grade math skills and his now denied Michigan’s through age 26 special education because he “graduated”. I have a cousin with two autistic sons in Arkansas and her older son also “graduated” but struggled so significantly in college that she got him tested and discovered that his reading was only at grade school level even though he had a “diploma”. I don’t know how much she fought for him educationally but I know to what incredible lengths I went to over the years all to virtually no avail…

My son’s Primary Care Doctor, who has a practice devoted to complex special needs kids & families, including a significant cohort on the Autism Spectrum shared a chilling perspective. She said that the “high-functioning” autistic kids, like my son is now (he’s been significantly lower functioning when younger) are not coming close to having their needs met here in Michigan. If they are high enough functioning to be included in regular academic settings then often their “independent living” or functional “life skills” needs often go unaddressed. Once they get out of high school they discover that “the adult services industry” is woefully inadequately prepared to address so many of their needs. Also, because the many systems are so poorly managed and financially irresponsible and/or overburdened many times kids with significant needs do not come close to getting their needs met at any point…

Given that the “higher functioning” autistic kids are probably the ones most likely to be able to “handle it” to some degree in the regular/normal/neuro-typical world it would certainly seem in society’s best interest to help give them the tools and support necessary to foster their highest level of independence while young and thereby ensure a likely increasing percentage of such kids will grow into (nearly) independent adults. This would mean the possibility of significant resource allocation during the earlier years developmentally but should hopefully result in many more of these kids not needing nearly so much public support as they likely would otherwise had such intervention not have been provided. The arguments for early and intensive intervention for Autistic Spectrum kids have surely now made that perspective widely accepted and hopefully there has been sufficient time for data gathering to bolster this view “scientifically”.

In our family’s case, we spent many years and uncountable mental, emotional, spiritual, and financial capital attempting to get our local school system to DO THEIR LEGALLY MANDATED JOB…and these requests were based on data, diagnoses, and clear evidence of myriad needs (many in keeping with autism spectrum issues)…however the real bottom line was that my son got virtually Only what the school felt like offering whether it directly addressed his needs or not. And since they absolutely refused to acknowledge or address his Autism Spectrum issues (which were known as early as 2000 and had written behavioral pediatrician’s orders) he was significantly negatively impacted by not having received these necessary (and technically IDEA mandated) services.

The cost to our family (we had four kids within four years) was/is truly incalculable. I’m not “blaming” the school for all the issues, but had they done their job there are so many things that would have gone differently. For instance my son required significant therapeutic intervention, especially when he was younger, so we would take him to PT (Physical Therapy), OT (Occupational Therapy), SLT (Speech & Language Therapy), Sensory Integration Therapy, Music Therapy (which I tried for years to get the school to provide to assist in re-mediating his Severe Learning Disability in Math), Art Therapy, Psychological Therapy, Visual Therapy, etc…We spent so much of what should have been family free time shuffling him to and from these visits and when I finally stepped back from it one year due to personal overload and burnout basically watched him deteriorate before my eyes. He should have had year round intensive intervention provided by the school but they absolutely refused to analyze or address his very real needs and declines. I actually ended up dragging all my kids to random Vacation Bible Schools over a few consecutive summers just to try to give my Special Needs Son some degree of educational structure (and all the other kids really came to resent this as they got to attend these nearby VBS’s along with their brother). There were a few years when being out of school got so upsetting for my son that he lost his toileting skills…but they immediately returned when school began. This level of distress did not concern school staff at all but it caused significant suffering for my son…and the rest of us.

Well, this obviously went on Way Longer than I intended it to. I’m so glad you are putting your voice out there and speaking up on behalf of yourself and others who may not choose to speak but whose experiences and perspectives resonate with yours. My son has come such a long way from those virtually non-verbal and overwhelming sensory distress days to having discovered himself and continuing to refine his own unique voice. Although “movie quoting” and verbatim dialogue still punctuate much of his communication he can at least now speak as himself so much more freely now than ever before.

Loving someone with autism and living with someone on the Spectrum can certainly be a challenge (and I won’t minimize the major hardships of our personal journey historically &/or presently) but it also presents a tremendous amount of joy as well. Our “special” son is really the heart of our family in so many ways. He is a constant source of entertainment and his humor is so random that it continues to surprise and amaze us all, which is a huge blessing and counterpoint to the stressors. However he also represents a personal bridge between this world and the Kingdom of God (he is a very strong & outspoken Christian)…he has seen the Face of God while undergoing his Liver Transplant and (similarly to his dad) can have a nearly conversational relationship with the Lord. I really believe that his “autism” facilitates this transparency. Just as he doesn’t know how to put a “mask” on in his human relationships, he is virtually incapable of having a barrier between himself and God. Witnessing his Christian Walk is both humbling & encouraging for those who live with him. If he struggles to talk with us earthlings there is no communication barrier with his Heavenly Father…and that is a gift that no “labeling” nor lack of supports could ever diminish!

Blessings, thanks for all you shared, and thanks for letting me “wax eloquent” too here.

Best Regards, Valerie Curren

PS, I wrote more thoughts on your article at my blog here…I’d love to hear back from you on that, if you might be interested…

https://specialconnections.wordpress.com/2016/10/11/commenting-on-autism-its-different-in-girls-so-is-adhd/

this provocative image could lead us to consider these topics further…hmm; from:

http://theemergencesite.com/AutismSpectrumMenu.html

Image result for autism adhd

Commenting on Falling Forward

Below are my comments to an inspiring article here (and I’m copying an image below from that page too…it’s so inspirational!).  Please read her description of falling, wounds, recovery, and continuing on…especially in the strength only the Lord can provide…

https://angelaschua.wordpress.com/2015/01/21/falling-forward-tomber-en-avant/

Thank you for sharing this aspect of your journey…it is such an encouragement. I’m still in the process of getting up after a metaphorical “fall” in relation to helping champion my disabled son’s needs in relation to education and frankly am still reeling months after the fall. I’ve written about this topic in various ways, but particularly in the below noted posting at my “Special Connections” blog. Thanks for your encouraging words in the Lord.

Blessings, in Christ,

Valerie Curren

https://specialconnections.wordpress.com/2016/02/18/commenting-on-only-the-rich-will-have-rights-article/

I also allude to these struggles (in rising after a fall) here:
https://specialconnections.wordpress.com/frailty/

I’d love to hear any feedback from you if either of those posts might speak to you…

 

2015/01/img_6725.png

Commenting on yet another DNA Explained Blog posting

Below is a comment I made to another DNA Explained blog posting  in response to another commentator’s post.  My response was based on relatively recent experiences at the Gaylord, Michigan Family History Center, a local branch where genealogists can access much of the Mormon Church’s massive Family History Library’s holdings.  On the rare times I get to be in Gaylord during the week I will make a concerted effort to access the local FHC…as the ones that are closer to my home require much more travel coordination that the one near my parents’ vacation Cottage.
Here is the article that both Roger (I copied his comment below) and I were responding to:
This above blog posting gives a very thorough treatment of Ancestry.com’s DNA testing, comparing the current to the previous version.  I was given an Ancestry DNA kit relatively recently and have been reading Roberta Estes’ postings on Ancestry DNA as part of my information trajectory for when to send in our own DNA samples, hoping to avoid the upheaval expected at Ancestry as they were transitioning between their old and new test versions…fyi…Valerie

I don’t know if anyone will read this or even care, but want to express my dissatisfaction with the ‘new’ Ancestry.com way of doing business, which also carries over and severely impacts my research of 10 Ancestry DNA kits that I administer —

For the rest of my limited time on Earth (I’m 70), I’m not going to waste it on Ancestry.com phone queues that are ultimately unsatisfactory. I’m done calling you guys — you promise all and deliver nothing.

My 3-year-old cry for support with outgoing in-app messages has never been resolved. In fact, you recently closed my last Ancestry Support Case — 00155616 — without even following up by telling me why.

The last time I phoned, the lady promised me a 3 month complimentary sub when my paid one ran out. Instead, I received — “Roger, we’re sorry auto-renewal took you by surprise.
We automatically renew our membership packages to make sure our members always have access to their discoveries and family history tools. But it seems we weren’t very helpful this time. To make it up to you, we’d like to give you a chance to save 15% on your membership.” — Thanks, heaps!

You shift the burden on us users to call you, instead of allowing me to e-mail. I’ve called at least 8 times over the last year. You’re ignoring me, I guess. Is this your business strategy? Too big to fail?

Oh well, in response, I’m switching over to Geni. Sorry it had to end this way.

  • Hey Roger,

    I was recently at a small town Family History Center in Gaylord, Michigan and the manager of that center spent a significant amount of time assisting a patron via the phone and web in handling some type of problem with Ancestry (I’m not sure if that was a DNA problem, per se). She used her FHC leadership position to apply pressure to the seemingly less than helpful Ancestry employee in an attempt to resolve the patron’s problem. This service may be reflective of FHC service in other locations or an example of a lesser trafficked location’s leadership going above and beyond.

    Based on this observation may I suggest that you consider visiting a local Family History Center (you can find them from FamilySearch.org) and seeing if you may be able to get direct help in navigating treacherous Ancestry waters. That FHC manager also mentioned that (at least at that Gaylord “church”) if you joined the “church” that you automatically could/would receive a free Ancestry.com membership. From my perspective this Could mean that if one could locate Mormons that are also involved in DNA this could lead to a group that by definition works with Ancestry and likely Ancestry DNA. Hope this hint may be of some help.

    Best Regards,

    Valerie Curren

Commenting on Genealogy Article

Since it’s been a while since I’ve felt the strength and motivation to write here at Special Connections I decided to post comments I’ve made previously on other sites as a way to easily access some of my occasional other writings…
The blog, DNA Explained, is very inspirational to me from a genealogical and scientific perspective.  There have been a number of times when I will spend seemingly “hours” on reviewing the writings there.  Roberta Estes, the authoress, is thoughtful, thorough, and articulate in a detailed manner that is never boring.  She can wade into the minutia of a topic in such a way that the lay person can gain insight into arenas normally off limits without hefty amounts of topic immersion.  She does an amazing job of bringing her own family history alive and making “genetic genealogy” more accessible to those of us with interest but lacking technical background in that arena…
The comments copied below were in response to the article here:
This article is one in her series of “52 Ancestors”, which I believe was a challenge topic put out there by another genealogist to challenge fellow genealogists to begin writing up their family history in such a way as to get their genealogy together enough to pass along the fruits of their efforts to others.  As such the challenge is to write up an ancestor each week for a year (or so it sounds).  Since this above article is for #92 Ms. Estes obviously didn’t stop at 52.  It is my hope to begin writing up such “reports” on my own genealogical endeavors in the relatively near future…and Roberta’s formatting is inspirational!
Blessings to All,
Valerie

I really enjoyed reading about your ancestors and appreciate so many details and pictures. The quilting heritage reminded me of both my grandmothers and their quilts that have become such a part of all our lives. My mom’s mom used to make a special quilt for her grandchildren for when they were getting married. She signed and dated them in one corner, which makes them even more tangible from a family history perspective. She made many quilts over the years and donated so many of them to their Lutheran Church to use in raffles and various fundraisers which helped to erect a new steeple at that church. At some point I hope to create family history pages like these you’ve shared about your family…they (and you) are an inspiration! Blessings…