Silent Scream, the Genocide of the Unborn

“As regards the genocide of our unborn, some may choose to look away, but you can never say you did not know about the Holocaust of the Innocents. The screams of the unborn cry out to be heard.”

Abortion is an abomination & a stain on our nation’s very soul.

http://www.numberofabortions.com/

Here is a companion Q Treehouse post on abortion:

https://wqth.wordpress.com/2019/01/30/infanticide-in-new-york-state/

& here is a link to Ronald Reagan’s insights on abortion 10 years after Roe v Wade:

https://patriotpost.us/documents/84

“At the time of Reagan’s essay, in the 10 year period since the Supreme Court allowed abortion, (by then it had been expanded into the 3rd trimester) the country had already killed 15 million of its babies. In the 46 years since Roe v Wade, America has killed 61 million of her unborn. President Reagan would be shocked that we had not undone Roe v Wade.” from the Infanticide post linked above…

https://twitter.com/OmarHamada/status/1088136519146188800?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw%7Ctwcamp%5Etweetembed%7Ctwterm%5E1088136519146188800&ref_url=https%3A%2F%2Fwqth.wordpress.com%2F2019%2F01%2F30%2Finfanticide-in-new-york-state%2F

 

The Q Tree

In 1962, Rachael Carson published a book, “Silent Spring,” – which was basically a treatise, where Ms Carson contended that the entire ecosystem was adversely affected by the indiscriminate use of pesticides, particularly, DDT. Using “Silent Spring” as a metaphor, her premise was that the adverse environmental effects were so catastrophic that conceivably, some day, spring, when new life begins, would be silent.

It’s likely that few people don’t know the volcanic impact that book had on the social-environmental movement of the 1960’s – but the result was explosive – leading to the banning of DDT, and restricted use of pesticides and chemicals in general. This post isn’t, of course, to debate DDT, but it is to speak of another Silent Spring.

The Silent Spring of the unborn. The cries of babies we’ll never hear.

On Jan. 22, 1973, eleven years, and four months after the world began to worry…

View original post 1,153 more words

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